1. INTRODUCTION
  2. STUDY AREA PROFILE
  3. HISTORY OF DISASTER IN ROHTAK DISTRICT
  4. RESOURCE ANALYSIS
  5. RISK ANALYSIS
  6. MITIGATION STRATEGY
  7. MANAGEMENT PLAN
  8. SUB-PLANS
  9. REHABILITATION/ RECONSTRUCTION PROGRAMME
  10. CONCLUSION

 

 

DISASTER: THE SCENARIO

1.1 BACKGROUND

Ever since the beginning of the history man has struggled against the elemental forces of nature to establish his mastery over the environment. Although, science and technology have made tremendous strides in the present century, the struggle has not ceased. Many regions of the country are vulnerable to natural disasters and are becoming increasingly vulnerable. The past decade has witnessed an extra ordinary increase in the number and extent of natural disasters. The cost of weather related disaster in 1998 exceeded the cost of all such disaster in the decade of 1980’s. There were three times as many great natural hazards in the 1990’s as in the 1960’s while the disaster costs increased more than nine fold in the same period.

It is estimated that almost 3 million people have perished as a result of natural disasters in the past three decades. While tens of millions have suffered hardship (UN 1997). Things appear to be getting worse in two ways: natural disasters appear to be becoming more frequent and there effects more severe.

The poor are most likely to suffer from major disasters and the least likely to be ensured against loss. Is the disaster situation improving over time and do the numbers of disasters show any declining trend over the years? The answer seems to be negative.

Super cyclone hit Orissa resulting in grue some devastation in the state killing 10,000 people destroying 18 lakh houses to the ground, uprooting trees, twisting electric and telephone poles rendering million marooned for days, caressing off 4 lakh cattles and destroying nearly the entire agricultural crop. The ravages of the cyclone are beyond description. The cyclone effected the way of life of about 15 million people.

Floods during August and September 1995 in Rohtak was one of the severe in last 60 years when about 55% of the total area was submerged resulting in huge economic loss conservatively estimated as Rs. 2000/- Crores. By and large the economy of Rohtak district has been considerable shattered by unprecedented floods. 83.2% of the total villages were flood effected. Out of which 33.9% villages were badly flood effected and 49.3% villages were moderately flood effected. In Meham and Rohtak 87% and 62% villages were badly flood effected. While in Bahadurgarh & Jhajjar only 11% & 18% villages were badly flood effected Majority of villages were under moderately flood effected.

Very recently Gujarat had faced earthquake-measuring 6.9 on Richter scale and epicenter near Kutch district, shook the very edifice of our system. More than 3.5 lakh houses are collapsed across the 7633 villages and a number of cities causing unprecedented damage and death and destruction it caused was never seen ever before.

On the other hand, rapid population growth, unplanned development or lack of planning in human settlements, the constant use of environment and its resources has inevitable resulted in certain changes in the ecology and with changing environment changes. The nature and intensity of natural disasters has changed considerably.

 

 

1.2 NEED OF THE STUDY

India is amongst the nation most vulnerable to natural hazards. The unique subcontinent dimensions, geographical position and behavior of monsoon of India make this region among the most natural hazard prone in the world. Rohtak district is highly vulnerable to floods, earthquake due to its topography and geological conditions.

In order to meet the challenge posed by these various forms of disasters, a system of enormous scope must be undertaken. There is a requirement of preparedness measures, which are less costly than prevention. If any document is available with the administration which contains the detail information about vulnerable areas short term and long term measures, detailed information about the resources. The loss of human life and property can be saved upto some extent.

Present study i.e. Rohtak district too, is not an exception in the case. It has already experienced the floods of 1995, as well as fire hydrants time to time. Along with, it comes under the earthquake zone IV that is the second most vulnerable area for earthquakes in the country. Thus, it is clear that the study area too not free from natural disasters and can be involved by any one at any time. Therefore, it required a pre-planned strategy that will be efficient to reduce the damage and can recover the area rapidly.

All these answer lies at local level, because only by acting locally, we can secure ourselves. The solution of a problem can be had effectively from utilisation of local resources. And as far disaster management is concerned, the district level emerges out as most viable entity.

Thus the requirement of present study I.e. District Disaster management Plan is to make the people aware and prepare them to face any disaster. It also focuses to provide quick relief to the affected sections and areas that will result in less damage to life property

 

1.3 OBJECTIVES

 

1.4 SCOPE AND LIMITATION

This document will help the district administration, non governmental organizations (NGO’s), local community etc in raising awareness for disaster reduction at the level of decision making, public information and transfer of technology. This document also directs future the developmental activities in the district. The plan contains preparedness measures, prevention is concerned with long term aspect, policies and programmes to prevent or eliminate the occurrence of disasters.

The district disaster management plan will guide the operation of rescue and relief programme. This will help to reduce the damage of property and loss of human life.

 

1.5 SCHEME OF CHAPTERISATION

The first chapter discusses in brief the importance methodology and chapterisation for the district disaster management plan for Rohtak district.

Second chapter provides an insight to profile of the study area thereby highlighting aspects such as its location, administrative setup, physiography, climate, geology, rainfall etc

Third chapter deals with the disaster’s history such as floods, earthquake industrial accidents, railway and road accidents, hailfall and fire etc. this chapter shall bring forward the urgency as well as give the direction for making district disaster management strategy

Forth Chapter deals with the resource inventory of the disrict. This chapter shall give insight for the resources available in the district to cope with the situation of disaster in the district specifically and region in general

Fifth chapter shall identify the areas, which have high medium and low vulnerability in terms of specific disasters in the district. This chapter shall help to develop disaster specific strategy and risk and SWOT analysis.

Sixth chapter on the basis of risk analysis suggests disaster specific mitigation strategy as well as the ways through which the disaster can be avoided.

Seventh chapter the management plan in case if the disaster happens and cannot be avoided. This chapter shall specify the role of Deputy commissioner as the coordinator and various district level officers.

Eight chapter shall discuss the disaster specific emergency sub plan and role of various departments.

Chapter ninth shall discuss how to cope with the post disaster scenario in the district.

1.6 METHODOLOGY

STUDY AREA PROFILE

2.1 LOCATION

Rohtak district is located in southeastern part of Haryana State and constitutes a major part of eastern Haryana plain. With an area of 1668 sq. km it lies between -------- to 29 18' north latitude and 75 13' to ---------- east longitude. Rohtak District, a part of eastern Haryana plain is bordered by Sonepat in north east and Jind districts in the north, Jhajjar District in the South, Hissar district in the north west and Bhiwani in the West. The district headquarter is one of the eight identified priority towns in National Capital Region. Thus the location plays a vital role for the development of the district. Due to proximity to National capital, the developmental activities are taking place very rapidly. The district has witnessed rapid industrialisation, urbanisation, diversification in agriculture, change in occupation structure. The district is situated on the National Highway No. 10 leading from Delhi to Hissar.

 

2.2 ADMINISTRATIVE SETUP

Rohtak is one of the oldest districts of the state, which has been reorganised many times. The district is divided into Rohtak and Meham tehsil for administrative convenience. These two tehsil further divided in five community development blocks i.e. Meham, Lakhan Majra, Rohtak, Kalanaur and Sampla.

The detail of the villages per community development blocks is given below in the table no .1

 

Table No. 1

NUMBER OF VILLAGES BY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK

District

Tehsil

Development block

Villages

Rohtak

Meham

Meham

26

Lakhan Majra

18

Rohtak

Rohtak

34

Kalanaur

42

Sampla

23

Total

 

 

Source: census of India, 1991

 

2.2.1. BLOCK PROFILE

 

2.2.1.1. ROHTAK

The Rohtak block was created in 1954 with 56 villages and one town. It is the mostly populated block in the district It has a rural population of 159456living wth in the area of 23256ha. It is industrially developed block having 7 large and medium industries and lots of small-scale industries are working in the Block. One of Postgraduate Medical College of the state is situated at Rohtak.

 

2.2.1.2. LAKHAN MAJRA

The block was formed in the year 1974. It was a rural area of 15540 ha and rural population of 54809person spread over in 18 villages. The economy of the block is mostly dependent on agricultural activities.

 

 

2.2.1.3. MEHAM

The Block is situated in the north west of the district. The block has a rural area of 36977ha. And total population of 1202112 person spread over 36 villages. Canals are main source of irrigation and agriculture is the main occupation in the block.

 

 

2.2.1.4. SAMPLA

Sampla block is situated on the southeastern part of the district. The rural area of the block is 22400 ha covering 25villages and It has a rural population of 101249 persons. Industrial growth is gaining momentum Sampla. Agricultural implements are the main industrial products.

 

 

2.2.1.5. KALANAUR

Kalanaur block is situated on the southwestern part of the district There are 23 villages comprises of 170284 population with an area of 32973Ha.the economy of the block is mainly agrarian.

 

 

2.3 TRANSPORT LINKAGES

The district has good linkages to its surroundings and to the rest of the country through its rail and road network. National highway nos. 10, 71 and 71A passes through it as well as broad gauge railway network connects it to national capital territory of Delhi and other major urban centers. All towns and villages are linked to each other and to district headquarter with metalled road. Road length per hundred square km is 14.52 km. In addition to its good network the district enjoys a good transport system with a quite high frequency. State transport and private buses are available for the entire bit centres and towns after a short interval.

 

 

2.4 PHYSIOGRAPHY

Plain and some undulating sandy dunes mark the overall topography of the district. The average elevation of the district is about 220 meters above mean sea level. There is gentle slope of about 19 cm. per kilometre from north-east to south-west. The north-eastern part have a number of wide quilled, low land with salict channels slopping from North-North East to South-South West. The hydrologic gradient of ground water is very gentle. (Report on Geohydrological Condition and Scope of Ground Water Development in district, Rohtak)

Rohtak district is comprised of vast Indo-Gangetic alluvial plain. District is sub-divided into following two sub-regions on the basis of soil, topology and climate.

 

 

2.4.1 MEHAM PLAIN

The region extends over the Meham tehsil and western part of Rohtak. A branch of it further enters in newly created district of Jhajjar and extends over western part of it. The Meham plain of Rohtak district makes its boundaries with Hissar and Bhiwani districts in west, Jhajjar district in south, Jind and Sonipat district in the north and Rohtak plain in the east. The soil of the region is loamy. Climatically, The region is relatively dry than the Rohtak plain. Due to good network of canals, the region has shown good progress in the field of agriculture.

 

 

2.4.2 ROHTAK PLAIN

The region extends over the parts of Rohtak tehsil. It further covers Bahadurgarh tehsil and northern part of Beri tehsil of Jhajjar district. It makes its boundaries with Meham Plain in the west, Sonepat district in the north, and Jhajjar district in the south. The soil found in the region is loam. It is agriculturally well off due to better concentration of rainfall and canal irrigation. Its slope is towards south. Due to its close proximity of Delhi this region has very large industrial development.

 

 

2.5 GEOLOGY

The geological structure of the district consists of alluvium (recent), loam (Bhangar and Nadrak), coarse loam (daher and chaeknote). Infect, the district is a part of indo Gangetic alluvial plain ranging from Pleistocene to recent age. Aeolian deposits of sub recent age cap the plains. The sediments comprise of clay, sand and kankar mixed in different proportions. No exposure of hard rocks forming the basement are seen in the area which one as deep as three hundred metres. Geological succession of the area is as under: -

Age

System

Formation

Pleistocene to recent

Recent to sub recent

Alluvial Aeolian sand

 

 

2.6 SOILS

The sediments consist of Sand, Silt, Clay, Gravel & Kankar etc. The soil texture varies from Sandy to clayey having a heterogeneous composition with frequent calcium carbonate layers at shallower depths. The soil is coarse to fine loam in texture in most of the area. 10% of the total area is affected by salinity. And Alkalinity problem due to poor drainage, brackish waters and compacts Kankar layer below root zone. (Report on Geohydrological Condition and Scope of Ground Water Development in district, Rohtak)

 

 

2.7 CLIMATE

The climate of Rohtak district is sub-tropical, semi arid, Continental and monsoon type. Thus, it has hot summers, cool winters and small rainy season. The winter season starts towards the later half of November and extends till about the middle of March followed by summer, which continues till about the end of June when maximum temperature reaches up to 45 C and dust cyclones are common. After it, Southwest monsoon arrives. The rainy season remains between July to September. The post monsoon months October and November constitute a transitional period from monsoon to winter season.

The climate is ideal for agricultural development, particularly for wheat, rice, sugarcane and cotton crops. Limited rainy season, good and healthy climate is suitable for industrial development also.

 

 

2.8 RAINFALL

Annual rainfall of the district is about 58 c.m. Rainfall is unevenly distributed and DDCReases from south east to Southwest. Rainy season starts from July to September. About 80% of the total rainfall is received during this period. Some amount of rainfall is received from western disturbances during winter season. Due to less rainfall and its short duration the agricultural activities is mostly dependent upon canal irrigation and Tubewells.

 

 

2.9 DRAINAGE SYSTEM

Rohtak district is a part of Inland drainage basin. The topography of the district is saucer type, therefore, rain water creates flood problems in monsoon season. In order to avoid flood, drains have been dug out. The main source of draining floodwater is drain no. 8, which is contributing a lot of ground water recharge. It enters the district in village Sanghi. It flows along the western side of the district headquarter and leaves the district and enters Jhajjar district near Beri. This drain safeguards the district from floods. Two new drains have been dug after 1995 floods to drain off the water of Meham, Lakhan Majra & Kalanaur area into drain no. 8. These are Meham drain which is 42 Kms. and passes through Kalanaur & Meham blocks covering 33 villages. Second is Lakhan Majra drain, which is 33 Km. Long, covers 23 villages of Meham and Lakhan Majra blocks. These two enters in drain no. 8 at village Kalanaur ultimately going to the river Yamuna.

Jawahar Lal Nehru Feeder & Jhajjar sub branches are the two main canals running in the district with its sub branches, distributeries, minors and sub-minors. Bhiwani and Kalanaur sub-branches enter in the district in the territory of Meham and Lakhan Mara Blocks and feed the area of Kalanaur, Lakhan Majra and Meham blocks. Most of the drainage problem is along canals and its distributeries passing through the district.

There is no perennial river in the district. During rains the water, instead of flowing into some rivers, follows a cause directed towards inland depression in eastern and Southern parts of the district and these areas get flooded.

 

 

2.10 HYDROLOGY

The development of an area largely depends over the quality as well as quantity of ground water. As far Rohtak District is concerned ground water occurs in semi-confined to unconfined aquifers. The unconfined aquifers are tapped by dugwells. While the semi-confined aquifers are tapped by shallow Tubewells which are 22,000 in number (annexe 1)

In the district depth to water table ranges between minimum 0.48 metres in village Gugahari (block Rohtak) to maximum 10.25 metres below ground level in village Badwa (Block Meham). Almost the whole area of the district lies within 10 metres of depth to water table below ground level. About 17% area (27646 hectares) falls under water logging conditions i.e. water level upto 3 metres depth below ground level. (Annexe 2)

 

 

2.11 NATURAL VEGETATION

The vegetation of this region is dry deciduous scanty, xerophytic and widely dispersed. The dominant type of tree found in the area are Acacia species(Acacia nilotica, Acacia tostilis), Jaal (Salvadora oleoides), Ber (Zizyphus maruitiana) and Shisham (Dalbergia Sisso) etc. are found on the road side and the banks of old canals. The total area under forests is only ________, which is very less and negligible.

 

 

2.12 DEMOGRAPHY

Human capital of an area plays an important role in the development of that region. Development to a large extent is attributed to the quality, quantity, structure and composition of population of an area. The main characteristics of the population of Rohtak district are discussed here in detail.

 

 

2.12.1 TREND OF POPULATION

District stands at thirteenth place in terms of population and ________ in terms of area amongst the districts of Haryana. As per 2001 census, the total population of the district is 940036 persons. The population has increased about______ times in last 40 years. The growth rate was 22.6% per annum between 1951-61 which went up to 20.99 per annum in 1991-2001, which is much less than the state average growth rate i.e. 28.06 per annum.

 

 

Table no. 2

GROWTH OF POPULATION (1971-2001)

year

Total population

Net increase

Growth rate

1971

   

26.02

1981

   

20.84

1991

776966

 

17.79

2001

940036

135693

20.99

 

Source Census of India

 

2.12.2 DENSITY OF POPULATION

Density of population indicates towards the intensity of population on infrastructure and other resources of the region. It also helps to estimate the severity of a calamity if it takes place in a densely populated area. Thus, analysis of density of population has become much important. As per the density data, district ranked 6 in 1991, which went down to 8th rank as per 2001 census. Present density of Rohtak district is 539 persons / sq. km., which is much higher than the national average and state average

 

Table no. 3

BLOCK WISE DENSITY OF POPULATION (1981-2001)

Block

Density

1981

1991

2001

Meham

  284  

Rohtak

 

340

 

Sampla

 

412

 

Lakhan Majra

 

308

 

Kalanaur

 

318

 

District

 

445

539

 

Source: Census of India

 

 

2.12.3 LITERACY

Literacy plays a key role to improve the skills of human capital of the region. if an area has high literacy rate than it will be much easier to make them to understand the importance the preplanning of disaster and will help to create awareness rapidly. High literacy rate also insures high level of community participation. As per year 2001, the district shows literacy rate of 74.56%, which is quiet high than national average and state average.

 

 

 

Table no. 4

LITERACY RATE IN ROHTAK DISTRICT (1991-2001)

Year

Component

Total

Male

Female

1981

Total

     

Rural

     

Urban

     

1991

Rural

     

Urban

     

Total

     

2001

Rural

     

Urban

     

Total

74.56

84.29

63.19

 

Source: Census of India

The urban areas recorded higher literacy rate (%) than the district average. There is large difference between male and female literacy in the district. The male literacy rate is 84.29 % while female literacy rate is 63.19%.

 

 

2.12.4 SEX RATIO

Sex ratio has significant role as it effects the social and economic relationship within a community. In preparation of disaster management too its analysis is essential as male population generally does major rescue work. While females look after the deceased persons and can provide them psychological support.

 

Table no. 5

SEX RATIO IN ROHTAK DISTRICT (1981-2001)

 

Year

Total

Rural

Urban

1981

869

   

1991

849

   

2001

847

   

 

Source: Census of India

In regard to literacy rate, the district has maintained its 15th position in 2001 census as it was in 1991 census. The sex ratio is low due to migration from outside. Low sex ratio at birth, low status of female in society, low literacy, less awareness may be factors, which effects the sex ratio of the district.

 

 

2.12.5 URBANISATION

it plays vital role in development of any region. While developing a system for effective management of disasters in the region the study of urbanisation hols important place as urban centres have better infrastructure systems and other facilities as well as a large portion of urban population is skilled in one or other sector. Which can be of great help during a disaster.

 

Table no. 6

GROWTH OF URBANISATION (1981-2001)

Year

Total population

Total urban population

% of urban population

1981

 

190869

 

1991

776966

253541

 

2001

940036

329550

 

 

Source: Census of India

The urban population grows rapidly due to industrialisation in-migration from rural areas due to better infrastructure facilities.

 

 

2.12.6 OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE

The occupational structure of the district will reveal the level of development of economy and the type and nature of economic activities in which people are engaged. While preparing disaster management plan this information will assist the district administration to assign the responsibilities to the different sectors of workforce and may utilise them during the rescue work when a disaster comes. (Annexe 2.3)

 

 

2.12.7 SETTLEMENT PATTERN

Settlement pattern considers the size as well as the distance of a particular settlement to its surrounding ones. Such analysis will help to evaluate the extent of damage during disaster and will also help to prepare a network to send the rescue and relief materials to the effected areas.

 

Table no. 7

DISTRIBUTION OF SETTLEMENTS BY SIZE (1991)

Size

(No of persons)

Settlement

No of settlement

% to total

<200

5

3.54

200-499

6

4.25

500-1999

23

16.31

2000-4999

64

45.93

5000-9999

38

26.95

>10000

5

3.54

Total

 

100

 

Source Census of India

 

2.13 AGRICULTURE

Agriculture is most effected sector of economy during a disaster like flood and provides much support in rescue work as it fulfils the primary requirement for food as well as raw material for industries. While preparing disaster management plan it becomes necessary to examine the land use pattern and its changes, man-land ratio, cropping pattern and intensity, major crops productivity and surplus production. Here, except productivity and surplus production, all these aspects except productivity and surplus production. Which will be considered in separate chapter during resource analysis.

 

 

2.14 LIVESTOCK RESOURCES

During disasters it is not only the human beings but also the livestock who are effected. The 1995 floods of Haryana, 1998 supercyclone and 2001 earthquake of Gujarat are the liveliest examples. In all these situations the animals were very badly effected.

 

 

2.15 INDUSTRIES

Ample agricultural resources, availability of skilled labourers, a good network of infrastructure facilities and various incentives offered by Government coupled with its close proximity to Delhi has given good impetus to the new enterprises to establish their industries in the district. Some new industrial centres are coming up fast along N.H.-10 passing through the district. Rohtak is one of the privileged districts to have essential infrastructure facilities. All villages are electrified and well connected by pucca roads. The district is well provided with other essential service like postal service, education/health etc.

 

The distribution of industrial activities is, however uneven. The majority of industrial units are concentrated at Rohtak only. Some more industries are expected to be shifted to the district because of judgement of Supreme Court to shift some category of industries out of Delhi.

 

 

HISTORY OF DISASTERS

3.1 INTRODUCTION

The insight in to the history of disasters in the district specifically and the region in general is very important. The history of disasters helps to give a direction to think upon. In nutshell, history of disasters of the district indicates about the areas, which immediately needs to be think upon. Such as history of Rohtak district, clearly tells that floods are on top priority. But it does not mean that if any disaster that does not happen in the past may not happen in future also.

 

 

3.2 FLOODS

Floods have become regular phenomena in Rohtak district. This is even after; Rohtak is not situated along any river. On an average flood returns the district every 8 years.

Some of the major floods in the district are of 1960,1980,1987 and 1995. Of which the most devastating flood was during August and September 1995. This flood was termed as one of the severe in last 60 years when about 55% of the total area was submerged resulting in huge economic loss conservatively estimated as Rs. 2000/- Crores. These unprecedented floods largely shattered the economy of Rohtak district. 83.2% of the total villages were flood effected. Out of which 33.9% villages were badly flood effected and 49.3% villages were moderately flood effected. In Meham and Rohtak 87% and 62% villages were badly flood effected.

 

 

3.3 ECONOMIC LOSS DUE TO 1995 FLOOD

Details of flood losses area given in the following table

 

Table no 1

LOSSES DUE TO FLOODS, 1995

 

No. of villages effected (old)

343 villages

Total population effected

7 Lakhs

No. of Houses damaged

55918

Area effected

214809 Hectares

Human death

39 Persons

Estimated total loss

Rs. 2000/ Crores

Govt. Help

Rs. 56 crores

(Amount distributed for)

Crops losses

Rs. 1.24 Crores

Houses

Rs. 14.76 Crores

Tubewells

Rs. 0.25 Crores

Human Death

Rs. 0.20 Crores

Animal Death

Rs. 0.06 Crores

Traders

Rs. 0.55 Crores

 

Source: Flood Control Department, Rohtak

The table given above is based upon the old Rohtak comprising of the present Rohtak and Jhajjar districts. The above table shows the severity of floods in the district. Nearly 7 lakh people were effected by these floods. The number of villages which were effected by the floods were 343 (map no 3.1). Around 214809 hectares of land was effected. 39 people were died because of the floods. The total economic loss was of the tune of Rs.2000/- Crores.

 

 

3.4 VULNERABLE AREAS

On the basis of past experience, Irrigation department has categorised the villages in to three categories (shown in the map 3.2) as:

  1. Dangerously Exposed Villages
  2. Badly Effected Villages
  3. Moderately Effected Villages

 

3.4.1 ROHTAK SUB DIVISION

 

3.4.1.1. DANGEROUSLY EXPOSED VILLAGES

  1. Ghuskani
  2. Maina
  3. Katwara
  4. Baland
  5. Khidwali
  6. Kahanaur
  7. Masudpur
  8. Naya Bans
  9. Garnauthi

 

 

3.4.1.2. BADLY EFFECTED VILLAGES

  1. Chiri
  2. Kiloi Khas
  3. Dhamar
  4. Patwapur
  5. Ritoli
  6. Assan
  7. Polangi
  8. Sunari Kalan
  9. Kabulpur
  10. Rurki
  11. Baliana
  12. Pakashma
  13. Kakrana
  14. Kanheli
  15. Samchana
  16. Hassangarh
  17. Karontha
  18. Morkheri
  19. Bhali Anandpur
  20. Sanghi
  21. Sunari Khurd
  22. Sundana
  23. Kiloi-Dopana

 

 

3.4.1.3. MODERATELY EFFECTED VILLAGES

  1. Kansala
  2. Samar Gopalpur
  3. Nonand
  4. Nandal
  5. Pahrawar
  6. Singhpur Khurd
  7. Bramanwas
  8. Bahu Akbarpur
  9. Marodi Jatan
  10. Dataur
  11. Garhi Sampla
  12. Singhpura Kalan
  13. Sasroli
  14. Sunderpur
  15. Bahu Jamalpur

 

 

3.4.2. MEHAM SUB DIVISION

3.4.2.1. DANGEROUSLY EXPOSED VILLAGES

There is no village in above mentioned head in Meham sub division

 

3.4.2.2 BADLY AFFECTED VILLAGES

  1. Chandi
  2. Kharanti
  3. Muradpur tekna

 

3.4.2.3 MODERATELY AFFECTED VILLAGES

  1. Ninadana
  2. Bharan
  3. Madina Korshan
  4. Girawar
  5. Madina Gindran

 

 

ASSESSMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURE

Infrastructure plays a vital role in the development of a region and help in the coping of natural and manmade disasters. It has great significance in the modern times when it is considered as an essential pre requisite for any kind of development. Existence of adequate infrastructure ensures the low risk and less damage and to gear up the rescue and relief operations after the occurrence of any types of disaster.

To keep the whole system under a good management system, accurate as well as appropriate assessment of infrastructure will give a better hold of the situation. Present chapter, analyse the resource availability in the district and identifies the gaps, which can be filled by the surrounding districts during the rescue and relief operation.

The analysis has been divided in to three broad headings:

  1. Physical Infrastructure
  2. Socio- Cultural Infrastructure
  3. Economic Infrastructure

 

 

PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

2.3 Transport Linkages

Transportation system can play crucial role during disaster if it is monitored well and assessed properly. An effective transportation system not only reduces the frequency of occurrence of an calamity but also provides much help to take the affected peoples to safer places and rescue and relief material to the disaster hit areas with in very less time.

 

Roads

The district has good linkages to its surroundings and to the rest of the country through its rail and road network. Delhi–Hissar-Fazilka National Highway no. 10 passes through it as well as broad gauge railway network connects it to national capital territory of Delhi and other major urban centres. All towns and villages are linked to each other and to district headquarter with metalled road. Road length per hundred square km is 14.52 km. In addition to its good network the district enjoys a good transport system with a quite high frequency.

 

  1. Health

 

It is also a major sector of concern during and post disaster when high number of people injured and lot of people seriously affected by these disaster. There are high chances for a disease or epidemic to take place in disaster hit areas. For this purpose there is requirement to have a detail list of doctor and other technical staff to keep society safe from health point of view. These include general as well as surgeons and specialists in various fields. Psychologists are also of great demand during disaster to hold up the morale of community. Both public and private practiceners should be considered for the purpose.

Nurses are also of great importance as they try to make the diseased persons to heal up soon and also create awareness among the people towards health. This staff is helpful for maintenance and operation of mechanical equipment. Whenever a particular disaster takes place there is chances of related diseases to come up such as :- flood have chances of Cholera, earthquake brings fractures, cuts, surgical problems etc. while fire hazard creates burning problems. Thus list of such type of diseases should be identified and all the required medicines should be kept ready in sufficient amount, round the clock. Periodic supervision and maintenance should be done. A list of the medicines available with the private clinics, chemist shops is prepared to combat such type of situation.

 

 

Resource Analysis (contd.)

 

While discussing print media we need their total number of circulation, extent of area and language used. On the other hand in electronic media consideration is given to total viewership ,hold over the telecast,extent of area in different languages. The other methods includes direct contacts through meetings , street play or banners and pumphlets etc., where success depends over the dedication of the organising authority .

 

 

RISK ANALYSIS

4.1 INTRODUCTION

Risk is the chance of an event (viz., earthquake, flood or industrial accident) happening that will have negative impact on the society and environment. Risk analysis deals with the systematic use of all available information to determine: (a) how often a specific hazard may occur and (b) the magnitude of their probable consequences. It implies that risk of a disaster is related to: (a) the hazard, (b) the vulnerability of society, structures and the environment to it, and (c) how well the hazards and vulnerabilities are managed.

Risk analysis of an area involves the following steps:

(i) Assess the hazard.

(ii) Vulnerability and Capability Assessment (VCA).

(iii) Quantify the risk.

(iv) Prioritise the actions.

 

Flood and Earthquake and are considered as the two main natural hazards in Rohtak district Information on the hazard scenario (chapter 3) in the district is used here to calculate the risk.

 

 

4.2 RISK ANALYSIS OF ROHTAK DISTRICT

The steps for analyzing the risk posed due to a hazard as mentioned above has been Adopted sequentially for Rohtak

 

 

4.2.1 HAZARD ASSESSMENT:

Disaster results from the impact of a hazard, therefore the first step of risk analysis is to assess the hazard. Hazard assessment is concerned with the properties of hazard itself.

 

  1. IDENTIFICATION AND DESCRIPTION OF HAZARD

 

(I) EARTHQUAKE

Rohtak district falls in Zone IV of Earthquake Hazard Map (Map No.) of India.

 

 

(II) FLOOD

Flood is a regular phenomenon in Rohtak. The most flood prone villages in the district are situated. About 55 villages are vulnerable to flooding due to the district’s particular topography.

 

 

(B) QUALITATIVE HAZARD ANALYSIS:

 

 

4.2.2 VULNERABILITY AND CAPABILITY ASSESSMENT (VCA)

 

(A) VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT:

Vulnerability is defined as the degree of loss to a given element at risk resulting from a given level of hazard. Vulnerability analysis (VA) is a process, which deals with the understanding of the types and levels of exposure of persons, property and the environment (against a hazard) at a particular time. This section deals with who and what are exposed to the earthquake. Hence it is clear that information on certain key parameters are essential in conducting VA. While assessing vulnerability of Rohtak, information has been taken from the 1991 census and emphasis has been given on social, economic, housing and environment issues.

 

 

(I) SOCIAL VULNERABILITY:

Social vulnerability mainly depends on factors like population density, age, gender and social caste. According to 1991 census, total population in Rohtak was 776966 and population for the year 2001 is 940036. It is seen from map that position and settlement on loose soil make the population of this tehsil more vulnerable to damage due to soil liquefaction, which may follow an earthquake. As the population along this belt is above one lakh , a large number of people are at risk. The district female population is 692779 and it is 48.5 % of total population. The sex ratio in Rohtak is 847 women per 1000 men. The age group also plays a major role in identifying vulnerable groups. The census report shows that age groups of 0 – 14, 15 –19, 50 –59 and more than 60 are more vulnerable than other age groups. Male genders are more vulnerable in 0 –14, 50 –59 and more than 60 age groups. Social caste is also important for identifying the vulnerability of a particular community.

 

 

(B) CAPABILITY ASSESSMENT:

Capability (or, manageability) is defined as the degree to which a community can intervene and manage a hazard in order to reduce its potential impact. In indicates the resilience of the community to hazards. Manageability of the community against earthquake at Rohtak have been assessed from the following steps which they take to combat the bad impact of earthquake:

 

  1. AWARENESS

It is observed that the awareness level of the government body and general public is good. The home guards and medical officer in the district have conducted in awareness programmes.

 

 

(II) PREVENTION AND MITIGATION MEASURES:

Normally two types of measure viz., structural and non-structural measures are followed. Two conventional methods of mitigation adopted in Rohtak for earthquake are timber framed buildings and seismic huts. In seismic huts, people are residing in masonry or adobe construction houses. Under nonstructural measures, there are no standard practices except some government level insurance to all people in Rohtak

 

 

(III) PREPAREDNESS

The rescue and relief plan developed in the guidance of district collector affirms that the Government and the public have already take preparedness measures.

 

 

(IV) RESPONSE CAPABILITY

Effort has been made by the district administration to categorize the activities for response. Rescue and relief teams have been constituted under the leadership of an officer - in charge. Police control system, medical relief responsibility and public welfare issues are also explained in the existing Rescue and Relief Action Plan of Rohtak Hence there exists a well-coordinated response strategy among the concerned departments and public.

 

 

(V) PUBLIC, GOVERNMENT AND NGO PARTICIPATION:

It has been observed that the teams constituted to carry out rescue and relief operation have representation from Govt., NGOs and public.

 

 

(VI) LAWS AND REGULATIONS:

There exists no hard and fast rules and regulations for management of emergency due to natural disasters.

 

 

4.2.3 QUANTIFICATION OF RISK:

A simple quantitative method has been adopted to assess the hazard, vulnerability and manageability in Rohtak The methodology has been described as follows:

  1. Hazard Assessment of earthquake in Rohtak has been done on the basis of information related to its frequency of occurrence, intensity or severity and its overall impact (Table No. IV). The factors mentioned here for assessment have been categorised as Certain, May occur and Not likely with numerical value of 3,2 and 1, whereas Very, Moderate and Low have been given numerical value of 3, 2 and 1 respectively. The risk due to the hazard calculated from hazard assessment only over Rohtak (as is shown in Table no.IV) is 5/3.
  2. Vulnerability assessment in Rohtak against earthquake has been done on the basis of the impact of earthquake on human population, buildings, infrastructures, resources and economy (Table no V). The factors mentioned here for assessment have been categorised as High, Medium and Low with numerical value of 3, 2, 1 respectively.

 

 

(c) Manageability assessment for Rohtak has been done by considering the factors viz., overall awareness of the public and Govt., laws and regulation governing this hazard, response capability of Govt. and community, existing procedures of warning or prediction system, prevention and mitigation measures, involvement of NGOs (Table no. VI a &VI b). Poor, Modest and Good with numerical value of 1, 2, and 3 respectively have been considered here to assess the manageability at Rohtak Hence the risk at Rohtak because of earthquake hazard only is calculated as:

 

 

4.2.4 PRIORITIZE THE ACTIONS:

With reference to the above mentioned risk analysis methodology adopted for calculating the risk due to an earthquake at Rohtak, it is recommended that the activities to reduce losses should be prioritized. Damages following an earthquake are primarily due to collapse buildings and infrastructures, hence among the activities taken to reduce losses, strengthening of buildings and infrastructure should be taken up a priority. The next priority should be given to further increase the awareness level of the Govt., NGOs and community and also to sustain it.

  1. VULNERABILITY

 

(i) Flood:

 

The drains have been designed with the formula of 7 cusecs per sq. mile which can be attributed to rainfall of "22 to 25" and the flood waters can be cleared within six days except the pockets/low lying areas of which water can not be dewatered through gravity flow. So it is considered that except these pockets, there will be no damage to the crops in the in the area. It is pertinent to mention that due to continuous flow, irrigation through canals and tube wells, the water table has come up and as a result thereof the crop pattern in the area has also switched to rice mainly from wheat, sugarcane, jawar and bajra. This has also become an additional factor for rise in water table. So the area is prone to floods. The main dewatering process for inhabited area i.e., villages and fields is being taken by the Irrigation Department.

III Preventive Measures:

i) Floods:

The floods can be anticipated, so stress is to be laid for the preventive measures as per saying "prevention is better than cure". So far as Rohtak district is concerned, worse affected has been the Rohtak town itself, because its location is Bowl type i.e., flood watrer has to be dewatered by providing three no. lifts form the jeart of the city. The responsibility to cleat the water rests with the Public Health Department and to make the system more efficient, the various steps such as round the clock electric supply to the pumps by providing alternative feeders, installation of stand by pumps. On the part of Irrigation, the protection of First line and second line ring bund which starts from Rohtak Gohana Railway line up to the Drain No. 8 and then from Hisar Road to Bhiwani Road and further up to Sunaria Road should be well maintained, because as per past history of floods of 1960, the Rohtak town had been victim of Drain No. 8. Though, the drain No. 8 has been rehabilitated and its capacity has been considerably increased by deepening and widening, but regular maintenance particularly clearance of jungle which generally grown is the bed of the drain also as this was the main factor which led to the inundation of Rohtak town by over flowing of drain No.8. Similarly, the worse affected area was during1995, Meham and Sampla due to non maintenance of drains in the area because there was heavy wild growth of patera, kabli kikkar etc. in the bed of pakasma drain due to which there was flooding in Sampla town without heavy rains in the catchment. Similarly, due to non-functioning of link drains in Gohana sub-division i.e., Isapur Kheri link drain, Bhambewa drain and Chhapra drain which outall into the drain No. 8 could not function properly and due to over flow at various points there was unwanted sheet flow in Meham area and worse affected villages were Madina, Mokhra, Behalba, and Nindana. To counteract the floods in the said area, Meham drain, Lakjanmajra drain have been constructed with link drains which untimately outfall into drain No. 8. The proper maintenance of these drains will definitely prevent the floods in the area. In additions to above, the various preventive measures are discussed as under:

Design Criteria for Flood Works:

The drains have been designed with the formula of 7 cusecs per sq. mile which can be attributed to rainfall of "22 to 25" and the flood waters can be cleared within six days except the pockets/low lying area of which water can not be dewatered through gravity flow. So it is considered that except these pockets, there will be no damage to the crops in the area. It is pertinent to mention here that due to continuous flow irrigation through canals and tune wells, the water table has come up and as a result thereof the crop pattern in the area has also switched to rice mainly from wheat, sugarcane, jawar and bajra. This has also become an additional factor for rise in water table. So the area if prone to floods, the main dewatering process for villages and fields is being taken by the Irrigation Department, whereas the dewatering process for villages and fields is being taken by the Public Health Department. The department has excavated number of drains in the area considering the disaster caused by floods of 1995.

Infrastructure of Drains:

To make the district flood-free, the rehabilitation of the existing drains has been done under WRCP while most of the drains have been constructed under NABARD project. During 1995, there was sheet flow between drain No.8 and JLN Feeder which ultimately entered in Rohtak town particularly. To counteract the same, Rohtak drain has been constructed which outfalls into Kultana-Chhudani-Dhupania drain. The latter has also been rehabilitated which outfalls into Najafgarh drain and ultimately the water is discharged kin river Yamuna. The list of the existing drains in Rohtak district is attached as Annexure-I.

3. Protection of Bunds.

The protection bunds are maintained by the Addl. Deputy Commissioner through concerned BD&PO every year. The detail of such bunds block-wise is given in Annexure-II.

4. Dewatering Arrangements and Availability of Material and Manpower.

(a) Irrigation Department:

The availability of pumping, machinery and manpower in the Irrigation Department is as under:

  1. Permanent Pump Houses: During the flood season, the primary responsibility of Irrigation Department is to carry out the dewatering of the flood waters affecting village abadies and fields. For this purpose, 10 nos. permanent pump houses having 273 cusec capacity stand installed in order provide relief to the village abadies, live-stock and fields. The list of such pump houses is given in Annexure-III.
  2. Mobile Pumps: Besides, some area which is not covered by these pump[ houses, mobile diesel pumping sets having 270 cs. Capacity and electric pumping sets having 630 cs. Capacity are also available in Water Services Mechanical Division, Rohtak for installation at various sites and ring bunds to protect abadies and fields from fury of floods as per site requirement. The list of the availability of mobile pumps is also attached herewithas Annexure-Iv.
  3. Temporary Electric Sites to be Installed up to 30.6.
  4. In addition to the above, some temporary electric sites as per list attached as Annexure-IV stand already identified as vulnerable sites where electric pumping sets are installed before 30.6 every year which will functioning as when necessity arises.

  5. Deferred Electric Sites: Apart from this, there are some more temporary sites, the installation of which can deferred due to site being approachable but electric connections are to be applied. These sites are to be installed during floods, if required. The list of such deferred sites is also enclosed herewith as Annexure-VI.

In addition to this, some more temporary sites are also installed in the fields according to the intensity of rains and requirement in the fields. So keeping in view the past experience, about 115 nos. electric and 130 nos. diesel sites will be installed in case of floods in the area. The sites to be installed are also depicted on the index plan attached herewith.

B-By Public Health Department:

For dewatering operation within Municipal limit is the responsibility of Public Health Department and for the said purpose, the following pumping sets have been installed:

 

Main disposal -20 Cs.

Storm disposal -26 "

Harijan Basti -14 "

HUDA complex -60 "

Guru Nanakpura -10 "

Nehru Colony -12 "

Model Town -6 "

 

Thus a total of 148 Cs. capacity has been installed by the Public Health Department for Rohtak town. With urbanization of the town, the pondage area has also been depleted and the entire quantity of storm water has to be pumped out. The maximum accumulation of storm water takes place in Chhotu Ram Park area. It has a catchment area of 1200 acres and only 60 cusecs of pumping has been installed. Thus in case of 4" of rainfall in a day 300 acre feet of water would be collected and it would take 2 and half days to clear the water.

 

Pumping Machinery:

The following stand by pumps are also available for dewatering of flood water.

    1. Electric Motors Pumping Sets
    2. 1. 50 HP 9 Cs. 1No.

      2. 35 HP 3.5 Cs. 1No.

      3. 35 HP 2 Cs. 3No.

      4. 10 HP 1Cs. 1No.

    3. Diesel Engine Driven Pumping Sets

1. 100 HP 9 Cs. 1No.

2. 40 HP 5 Cs. 1No.

3. 35 HP 2 Cs. 2No.

4. 10 HP 1Cs. 3No.

 

(ii) Earthquake:

Earthquake is one of those natural disaster where man, machine and science have failed to forecast the occurrence and intensity of the earthquake. Therefore, preventive measures for ensuring safety of building, structures, communication facilities, water supply lines, electricity and life are of utmost priority.

The Gujrat earthquake has shown that the damage could have been contained or reduced if people had built earthquake resistant houses or taken steps from time to time to strengthen the already built structures. The soil of Rohtak town has a very low load bearing capacity and hence does not have high rise or multi-storeyed buildings. The maximum height allowed both by the Municipal Committee and HUDA is 36 feet or three storeyed buildings. However, since it is an old township there may be several houses, buildings and structures which are about a hundred years old. Immediate steps need be taken to get them vacated and then demolished at an early stage. It is very important to remember that Rohtak district is a very flood prone district and Rohtak town has been badly affected by flood waters several times, the worst being those of 1962, 1983 and 1995 when the town continued to be inundated for several days and in some low lying areas for several weeks. These stagnant waters must have definitely affected the foundation and structure of both old and new houses.

II. Similarly, the Ismaila Railway over-bridge was badly affected by the flood waters of 1995 and the ROB was closed to heavy traffic for several days. The PWD (B&R) authorities may be directed to examine all such bridges and other like structures on the National and State Highways and take measures to strengthening them.

III. The Haryana Urban Development authority has already issued orders making it mandatory for all private builders, contractors and house owners to get certificates from structural engineers regarding the strength of their buildings and al those going in for new constructions will also have to get such certificates before shifting to a newly constructed house.

MITIGATION STRATEGY

 

  1. FLOOD

 

6.1 CAUSES OF FLOODS

The floods can occur because of two reasons:

      1. Natural Features
      2. Man Made Features

 

 

6.1.1 NATURAL FEATURES

        1. PHYSIOGRAPHY
        2. Rohtak District has saucer type of physiography. There are several pockets of low-lying areas in the district from which natural flow of rainwater is not possible. Since these depressions area not connected by drains. Due to its topographical configuration, rainwater finds natural flow in Rohtak District from the adjoining districts of Panipat and Jind. (Flood Control Order Rohtak, 1996). The surface as well as the ground water get accumulates in the district and the flood occurs.

        3. RAIN FALL
        4. The total amount of average rainfall in the district is about 50 Cm annually. But during September 3 to 5, 1995 more than 90-cm rainfall occurred on these three days. Such a heavy down pour resulted in devastating floods in the district. (Flood Control Order Rohtak, 1996).

        5. HIGH WATER TABLE
        6. Higher water table is also one of the important reasons for floods in the district. The average underground water is just 3 meters below the surface. The rainwater could not penetrate into the surface and remains on the surface also there is no natural outlet for the surface water resulting into the floods. (Flood Control Order, Rohtak, 1996).

        7. SHEET FLOW

High underground water table in the district surrounding areas result in sheet flow of water which moves from villages to villages causing havoc and destruction. (Flood Control Order Rohtak, 1996).

 

 

      1. MAN MADE FEATURES

The problem of floods is further accentuated by the existence of man-made barriers like the networks of roads and canals, which obstruct the natural flow of water. Notable among these obstructions are the Jawahar Lal Nehru canal and Jhajjar sub branch as well as the State highways passing through the district. Major damage to crops is caused due to flooding of such depressions in the district. 1995 floodwater were trapped in the Meham and Kalanaur area by the B.S.B leading to water accumulation. The reason for flood in Rohtak City was that the railway line (Rohtak-Panipat) was uprooted and the water infiltrated in the city. In the same way village Mokhra and adjoining villages got flooded because of N. H. 10 was disconnected which was obstructing the natural flow of water. These instances show that the transportation network here is faulty and is an obstruction in the natural drainage (General Observations)

Excessive discharge in drain no. 8 can cause breach in the drain endangering not only rural area but also Rohtak town, as it happened during the floods in the year 1960, 1980 and recently in 1995. (Flood Control Order Rohtak, 1996).

Flood havoc is also caused in the district due to inadequate capacity of major drainage network. In the event of excessive rainfall, congestion in the major drains effects crops in a large number of villages of the district. Apart from drain no. 8 sometimes-heavy congestion is caused in the catchment area of K.C.B. (Kuttana, Chhudani, Bhupania) drain due to not cleaning of the drain in Delhi, Territory.

Settlements also become one reason for floods. E.g. Rohtak City is located in the way of natural drainage. The natural drainage of the surrounding area is towards Kanheli village (situated in the south east of city). But because of the expansion of the city, the natural drainage has been obstructed resulting into floods. (General Observations)

 

 

    1. WATER LOGGING
    2. Water is one of the basic requirements of mankind for domestic and agriculture purposes. The water table, nearly 115 year before was in between 30 to 70 meters. The canals were introduced for the purpose of agricultural development and from here onwards the water table started rising and creating alarming conditions in certain pockets in district. The waterlogging problem has become serious from last few years and by 1998 the total water logged area in the district has reached upto 62%. This problem is critical along canals and at some places the water table has been exposed to the surface causing damage to land and crops. (Agriculture Department; Ground Water cell Rohtak)

      1. WATER TABLE CONDITION:

      Over 98% of the total areas of the district lie within 10 meters depth of under ground water. The area under water logging is increasing very rapidly. In the year 1994 only 11.1% and 34.1% area was water logged before and after monsoons respectively. (See Map 3.2 and 3.3) But in the year 1998 these respective figures has increased upto 41.6% and 61.8% in the same time periods. 1995 floods enhance the problem of water logging. Following table shows the trend of water logging since 1994 to 1998 in June & October.

      Table No. 6.2

      WATER LOGGED AREA (1994-98)

      Before Monsoon (in %)

      After Monsoon (in %)

      Tehsils

      1994

      1995

      1996

      1997

      1998

      1994

      1995

      1996

      1997

      1998

      Meham

      4.9

      6.6

      49.2

      44.8

      35.7

      22.1

      48.0

      52.0

      49.9

      45.9

      Rohtak

      16.2

      30.1

      61.8

      59.1

      52.5

      53.1

      95.6

      98.3

      89.2

      89.1

      District

      11.1

      16.4

      47.8

      45.7

      41.6

      34.1

      68.7

      72.5

      62.2

      61.8

      Source: Agriculture Department: Groundwater cell, Rohtak

      The water table in the district Rohtak is rising at the rate of 0.02 meters/annum. It is clear from the table that highest area under water logging is in Rohtak which was only 30.1 % in June and Reached upto 95.6% after the floods.

    3. GROUND WATER QUALITY
    4. About 10 million years ago the area of Rohtak district was submerged under ocean hence originally the quality of ground water is saline. On the basis of electric conductivity of ground water its quality is classified as under.

      Table No. 6.3

      Ground water Quality

      EC Value in micro mhos/ cm

      Quality

      <2000

      Fresh

      2000-4000

      Marginal Fresh

      4000-6000

      Marginal

      > 6000

      Saline

      Source: Agriculture Department; Ground Water cell, Rohtak

      1. GROUND WATER QUALITY BEFORE MONSOON

 

According to June 1995 figures, out of total area only 11.3% area comes under fresh category & rest 39.8%, 25.5% and 23.2% fresh, marginal & saline quality respectively. (See Map No. 3.4) The fresh water is available in pockets, mainly along the canals and drains and near the water bodies. Fresh water is available at shallower depths whereas the quality deteriorates along with depth.

Table No. 6.4

 

Ground Water Quality (Before Monsoon 1995)

Tehsils

Area In Percentage

Fresh

(0-2000)*

Marginal Fresh

(2000-4000)*

Marginal

(4000-6000)*

Saline

(> 6000)*

Meham

12.4

47.1

15.1

25.3

Rohtak

15.1

34.0

21.9

28.9

District

11.3

39.8

25.5

23.2

 

 

      1. GROUND WATER QUALITY AFTER MONSOON

After the monsoons ground water quality is improved. In the flood period area under saline water came down upto 6.3% from 23.2% (See map 5.5). Area under fresh water has incresed around three times after the floods.

 

Table No.6.5

 

Ground Water Quality (After Monsoon 1995)

 

Tehsils

Area in %

Fresh

(0-2000)*

Marginal Fresh (2000-4000)*

Marginal

(4000-6000)*

Saline

(> 6000)*

Meham

26.2

45.8

23.3

4.4

Rohtak

36.2

25.6

25.3

2.7

District

31.8

37.1

23.9

6.3

 

Tehsil wise details of water quality from 1994 onwards for the periods of before and after are given in Annexe no. 1-10. These tables show that the rainfall has an impact on the ground water quality. The total area under the saline water DDCReases after monsoon period because fresh water is increased & improves the quality of ground water. The same trend can be seen in case of fresh water. The amount of fresh water increases from June to October. Once the rainwater adds up in the ground water; it improves the quality of ground water. The impact of floods can also be seen on the quality of ground water. The ground water Quality has improved after the 1995 floods. But after one year area under saline water has been started increasing again. If Tehsils area categorised on the bases of saline water in June 1998, maximum area under saline water was Rohtak (10.2%) followed by Meham (5.9%).

Table No. 6.6

 

INDICATORS OF ECOLOGICAL DEGRADATION (1995)

Tehsils

% of Flood Effected Vilages To Total Villages

% of Badly Flood Effected Villages To Total Villages

% of Water Logged Area To Total Area

(Before Monsoon)

% of Water Logged Area To Total Area

(After Monsoon)

% of Saline Water Area To Total Area

(Before Monsoon)

% of Saline Water Area To Total Area

(After Monsoon)

Meham

100

8

6.6

48

25.3

5.6

Rohtak

96.5

62

30.1

95.6

28.9

2.9

Rohtak district

           

 

Source: Flood Control Office, Rohtak

Agriculture Department; Ground Water cell Rohtak

 

 

DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN

7.1 National level

At the national level, different Ministries are responsible for the management of situation relating to different types of crisis. The Ministry of Agriculture is the nodal Ministry for the management of situation relating to natural calamities such as drought, flood, earthquake etc. The Ministry of Environment and Forests is the nodal Ministry for management of chemical accidents. The Ministry of Railways is the nodal Ministry for managing rail accidents. The Ministry of Civil Aviation is the nodal Ministry for managing air crash and other civil aviation related crisis situations. The Ministry of Mines is responsible for the management of mining accidents. The Secretary of the concerned Ministry, generally heads the Crisis Management Committee at national levels which has representatives from the concerned Central Agencies dealing with different aspects of disaster response and recovery. In case of a very serious disaster, the Cabinet Secretary heads the Central Crisis Management Committee. The Central Crisis Management Committee establishes a Control Room at the concerned nodal Ministry depending on the nature of disaster.

 

 

7.2 STATE LEVEL

At the State level, different departments of the State Government act as nodal agencies for the management of different types of crisis / disaster situations. In the case of natural calamities, the State Relief Commissioner, who is generally also the Secretary of the State Revenue Department, is the nodal authority to monitor and direct natural disaster management activities in the state. In case of industrial accidents, the Labour Secretary becomes the nodal authority at the State level for its management. In case of rail accidents, the Home Secretary acts as the nodal authority for its management. Similar to the Crisis Management Group at national level, in case of a disaster of a serious nature, the Chief Secretary heads the State Crisis Management Group. The State Crisis Management Group also has the representatives of the concerned department and agencies responsible for different aspects relating to disaster response and recovery.

 

 

7.3 DISTRICT LEVEL

At the district level Collector, who has the general administrative control over all the district level office of different State Government departments, acts as the focal point for all types of disaster response and recovery activities. At the district level, there is no formal constitution of Committee for ensuring a coordinated response but the Collector because of his unique position in the government set-up at the district level is able to ensure functioning of a non-formal team of officials from different State government agencies. The power of sanction of relief is vested with officials of Revenue Department at different level, depending upon the operational needs. The Collector is able to ensure participation of different State Government agencies in the response and recovery activities and provides the necessary financial support and sanctions from the funds available with him for relief and for rural development works. He also manages to get the support, both managerial and material, from the NGOs.

 

In case of industrial accidents, involving, hazardous chemicals, Manufacture Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals (MS&IHC) Rules, 1989; issued by Government of India under the Environment Protection Act, 1986; provides for identification of hazardous chemicals and MAH units, notification of hazardous sites, safety audit of MAH units, and preparation of on-site & off-site plan chemical Emergency (Prevention Preparedness and Response) Rule as ammended 2000 under the Environment Protection Act, 1986 has provisions for constitution of formal Crisis Management Group at national, State, district and local levels. The constitution of these Crisis Management Groups is indicated at (Annexe– 7.1)

 

It has been the experience on many occasions that the existing organizational structure for disaster management has failed to provide a quick and coordinated response in many disaster situations. The Government of India has constituted a High Powered Committee for suggesting appropriate Disaster Management Plans at National, State and District level. The Committee is headed by Shri J.C. Pant, (retired Secretary, Government of India, Ministry of Agriculture). The Committee is making suggestions regarding model Disaster Management Plans at the National, State and District levels. The Committee is also likely to come up with an organizational structure, both for the national and state level for disaster management to take care of all phases of disaster management. The present document only seeks to propose an appropriate organizational structure at district level for the management of different phases of an emergency.

 

7.5 DISTRICT DISASTER MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE

The organizational structure suggested in DDMP will be based on following three concepts:

 

 

7.6 DISTRICT DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLANNING COMMITTEE (DDMPC)

DDMPC should be constituted only in the case where all the stakeholders particularly the local political leadership are members in disaster planning activity.

DDMPC should be constituted, which will be apex body to monitor the whole preparedness and mitigation activities regarding disasters in the district. DDMPC will have both official and non-official representation from the DPC (District Planning Committee), and also of local NGO’s engaged in disaster mitigation and relief activities.

Apart from the overall supervision of disaster management plan, DDMPC will also ensure the relevant administrative approval of mitigation schemes and flow of funds for disaster management planning, from the District Government and Panchayati Raj institutions etc.

DDMPC will comprise of:

  1. Minister in-charge, Rohtak, Chairman
  2. District Collector, Member Secretary
  3. Mayor, Municipal council
  4. Chairman, Zila Parishad
  5. Member of Parliament (MP), Rohtak
  6. Members of State Legislature (MLA’s) from the District Rohtak
  7. Block Presidents
  8. District Crisis Group members (Structure & responsibilities have been discussed further).
  9. Representatives of Non-Government & Voluntary Organizations engaged in disaster mitigation, planning, relief and recovery activities.
  10. Community representatives

 

 

      1. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DDMPC
  1. Evaluation, approval and updating of District Disaster Management Plan (DDMP)
  2. Dissemination of District Disaster Management Plan
  3. The committee would meet in July every year to review the overall mitigation and preparedness activities in the district.

 

The responsibility for dissemination of District Disaster Management Plan will lie with DDMPC. In order to make disaster management process more effective, in the district, it is important to disseminate the District Disaster Management Plan at all levels i.e. the district authority, government departments, non-government / private organizations and general public. Effective implementation of the DDMP would be done through training programmes and awareness activities will be organized for different levels of functionaries. Updating of the plan will be major responsibility of DDMPC in order to keep it a "living document" with the changing situations. The following are the guidelines, which should be considered, while updating the District Disaster Management Plan.

  1. A proper procedure should be introduced, to update the plan on a regular basis with the use of current information. The procedure for updating the plan is mentioned in Annexure
  2. The amendment in the plan should be supported with the date of amendment and such amendments should be communicated to all the concerned departments and organizations.

 

 

7.6.2 DISTRICT CRISIS GROUP (DCG)

An effective disaster management strategy must be supported by a quick decision making process which will include the issues related to warning, conduct evacuation and rescue & relief operations in the event of a disaster. This requires a core team of senior decision-makers having administrative control over the key resource organisations. Therefore, it is utmost need to constitute a DCG (District Crisis Group) with District Collector as its leader, who would also be the District Disaster Manager (DDM), because the District Collector exercises general administrative control over all district level officers and performs the role of District Relief Manager (DRM). The organisational structure for disaster management in the district has been proposed here, which recommends the District Collector as the nodal officer for control and co-ordination of emergency activities.

District Crisis Group will include:

  1. District Collector (Team leader)
  2. Superintendent of Police
  3. District Commandant , Homeguards
  4. Executive Engineer, PWD
  5. Divisional Engineer, HSEB
  6. Chief Medical Officer (CMO)
  7. Municipal Commissioner, Municipal council
  8. Chief Executive Officer , Zila Panchayat

 

District Crisis Group members may be required to reach the affected area for monitoring and co-ordination of the response functions at the site. District Disaster Control Room (DDCR) will facilitate functioning of DCG even when its members may be in the affected area. The members of DCG will be provided wireless facility for interaction with DDCR.

 

During emergency, the District Collector would act as the focal point for control and co-ordination of all activities. His responsibilities have been identified as follow:

  1. Get in touch with the local Army/ Navy/ Airforce units for assistance in rescue, evacuation and relief;
  2. He will have the authority to requisition resources, materials and equipment from all the Departments / Organizations of the government and also from the private sector;
  3. He will have the power to direct the industry to activate their onsite and offsite disaster management plans;
  4. He will set up ‘Site Operations Centre’ (SOC) in the affected area with desk arrangements;
  5. He will authorise the establishment of transit and / or relief camps, feeding centres and cattle camps;
  6. He will send ‘Preliminary Information Report’ and ‘Action Taken Report’ to the State Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner;
  7. He will authorize immediate evacuation, whenever necessary.

 

The Collector can select and appoint any officer of the State Government posted in Rohtak district, if he feels that the services of that officer are required for disaster planning or response operations.

 

  1. Responsibilities of the DCG
  1. On spot decision making;
  2. Control and co-ordination of response and recovery activities in the district;
  3. Resource mobilization and replenishment;
  4. Monitoring of overall response and recovery activities;
  5. Preparation of reports for submission to State Government through Relief Commissioner.

 

Traditionally, the tehsil office and local police station, both are the main government agencies below the district level, which will initiate trigger mechanism for emergency operations in the event of major accidents / disaster threats. In view of limited availability of resources for disaster management, below the district level, DDMP has not proposed any administrative structure for co-ordinated operation during emergency. In the event of less serious disaster threat / accident, the local tehsil office or police station would continue to initiate trigger mechanism and provide an emergency response with the help of locally available resources. DCG on receipt of information, from any of the two agencies, would take appropriate decision to augment local resources and give appropriate instructions to the concerned response agencies.

 

 

7.6.3 DISTRICT DISASTER CONTROL ROOM (DDCR)

A single District Disaster Control Room (DDCR) is proposed with desk arrangements for specific activities during a disaster. DDCR will have senior representatives from the key resource organizations to facilitate a co-ordinated response. The DDCR would be linked to Disaster Operation Centre (DOC) constituted at state level.

District Disaster Control Room will have very limited participation of people to avoid chaos and confusion. Therefore, the non-government agencies although having a role in the rescue and relief operations will not be represented in the District Disaster Control Room. However, to ensure the utilization of the manpower and material resources of these agencies, the Plan advocates to constitute a Sub-Group comprising of representatives of only non-government agencies, which will be responsible for distribution of relief materials obtained from external source, and also to support the government's requirement of additional manpower and material.

There seems to be no need to deploy large manpower in DDCR in normal times. The emergency situations in normal times are considered as minor emergencies, which can be handled on a regular day-to-day basis by the local police, fire department and the health department. There is practically no need to activate the DDCR beyond the routine staff for such minor emergencies. It is proposed that at normal times, the DDCR should have only one or two support staff.

During disaster, the district should increase and activate the DDCR beyond the routine staff to co-op with what is described as limited emergencies. During such period, the officer present in the DDCR should be capable of activating the DDCR to its full resource level on receiving the warning or information of a disaster. During this stage, most of the communication links of DDCR should be made fully operational. During disaster, District collector will have to direct the operations at the affected site; to coordinate at the district headquarter and to interact with the State Government to meet the conflicting demands at the time of disaster is the responsibility of the District Collector and his team. The Plan recommends a District Disaster Control Room to help the District Collector and his team to meet conflicting demands. A well-equipped DDCR in terms of manpower and equipment should be established to perform the following functions:

  1. Collection and compilation of information from the affected area;
  2. Documentation information flow;
  3. Decision making regarding resource management;
  4. Allocation of task to different resource organization;
  5. Supply of information to State Government.

 

    1. DESK ARRANGEMENTS

It is practically difficult for the District Collector and his team members to be present round the clock in the DDCR. Thus, it is proposed that the DDCR should have senior representative in the capacity of Desk Officers from the following key resource agencies:

  1. Search, Rescue & Evacuation desk;
  2. Logistics & Welfare desk;
  3. Medical desk;
  4. Infrastructure desk;

 

In case of flood, Infrastructure desk will have a senior representative from Irrigation department but in case of other disasters, a senior representative of the Public Works Department (PWD) will man the desk.

The DDCR will also have the necessary support staff to assist the senior representatives designated as Desk Officers in the DDCR. The Desk Officers will maintain a constant contact with the District Crisis Group members and the other district heads, to ensure quick decision-making. They will also be responsible to allocate task to concerned staff, resource management and information flow.

 

 

7.7.1 ACTIVITIES OF DISTRICT DISASTER CONTROL ROOM (DDCR)

(a) Normal time activity

District Collector will appoint an Administrative Officer as Officer-in-charge of DDCR. He will be responsible for the effective functioning of the DDCR. His responsibilities during the normal times will include:

  1. Ensure all warning and communication systems, instruments are in working condition;
  2. Information collection on a routine basis from the district departments on the vulnerability of tehsils and villages to disasters;
  3. Liaison with DDMPC;
  4. Develop status reports of preparedness and mitigation activities in the district;
  5. Ensure appropriate implementation of District Disaster Management Plan
  6. Maintenance of data bank with regular updating;
  7. Evaluation & updating of District Disaster Management Plan is the responsibility of DDMPC.

 

However, DDCR would keep an account of the amendments and accordingly review its response strategy. The Officer-in-charge of DDCR will be responsible for activating the trigger mechanism in the event of receipt of a warning or occurrence of a disaster.

 

 

7.7.2 ACTIVITIES ON OCCURRENCE OF EMERGENCY ISSUE WARNING / ALERT

On the basis of message received from the forecasting agencies, warning has to be issued for the general public and the departments, which play a vital role during emergencies. Issue of correct and timely warning would be one of the prime responsibilities of DDCR. For effective dissemination of warning DDCR should have a well-planned line of communication. The District Collector would be the authoritative body to issue warning. Formulation of warning message should consider the target group for which it is issued. For the warning, message to be effective it should be clear, consistent and timely, so that appropriate response time is given to the concerned agencies.

 

The warning or occurrence of a disaster will also be communicated to:

  1. State Relief Commissioner, DOC;
  2. Office of Divisional Commissioner;
  3. The officials of central government located within the district;
  4. Mayor, President Zila Panchayat, MPs and MLAs from the district or affected area;
  5. Local units of Defence Services;

 

Guidelines for issuing warning are mentioned in Standard Operating Procedure for DDCR placed at Annexure

7.8 DESK ARRANGEMENTS

The occurrence of disaster would essentially bring into force the following:

  1. The DDCR will be on alert stage and can be expanded to include desk arrangements with responsibilities for specific tasks;
  2. The District Collector will spell out the priorities and policy guidelines, co-ordinate services of various department and agencies including national and international aid agencies, and central government agencies. The DDCR, in its expanded from, will continue to operate as long as the need for emergency relief operations continue till the long-term plans for rehabilitation are finalized;
  3. For managing long-term rehabilitation programs, the responsibilities will be that of the respective line department. As already mentioned, the department sub-committee would be responsible for long-term recovery work. This will enable the DDCR to attend to other disaster situation, if required.

 

The desk arrangements provide for division of tasks, information gathering and record keeping and accountability of the desk officer to the District Collector. Each desk has two Desk Officers assigned, who would be on duty on rotation. The capacity of various desks to coordinate amongst themselves and with the units to be coordinated will ultimately decide the quality of response. All communication received and sent will be recorded in the "In and Out Messages and Register". Reports and information will be collected and processed according to the formats. The responsibilities and functions of each desk have been mentioned in Appendix.

  1. Post-emergency activities

After an emergency the main responsibility of a DDCR would be:

  1. Evaluation of relief and rehabilitation activities in order to assess the nature of state intervention and support, suitability of the organizational structure, institutional arrangements, adequacy of Operating Procedures, monitoring mechanisms, information tools, equipment and communication system.
  2. Post-emergency impact studies for long term preventive and mitigation efforts to be taken.

 

 

7.8.1 FACILITIES AVAILABLE WITH DDCR

  1. The facilities and amenities available with DDCR would include well-designed control room and workstations, wireless communication, hotlines, and intercoms. The DDCR, as a data bank, will maintain various district action plans and maps. Provision of a vehicle with wireless communication should be made for the DDCR during normal times.
  2. In addition to above, a DDCR should have space for various desk arrangements during disaster situations. DDCR should be equipped with:

  3. On-site Disaster Management Plans for MAH units;
  4. Map of the district indicating following information:
  1. Inventory of manpower resources, particularly address, telephone numbers of key contact persons;
  2. Inventory of material resources;
  3. List of experts;
  4. Important phone numbers, which are frequently required, will be displayed at appropriate places so that they can be referred easily, while other phone numbers, names and addresses etc., will be displayed on the computer to facilitate easy retrieval and cross-referencing.

 

 

7.9 COMMUNICATION ROOM (MAIN MESSAGE ROOM)

The police wireless system should continue to be in contact with the DDCR. In addition, the following facilities would be available in the communication room:

  1. Telephones;
  2. Fax;
  3. Intercom units for contact within the Collectorate;
  4. Civil Wireless Network upto Tahsildar level;
  5. One PC with modem and printer;
  6. Mechanical typewriter;
  7. Photocopying machine.

 

In every district, the police will have a well-established wireless communication system. Therefore, it is proposed that under any emergency the communication resources available with the police should be depended upon. During disaster, DDCR would be connected to:

  1. Divisional Commissioner;
  2. Site Operations Centre.

 

 

7.9 FACILITIES AT VARIOUS DESKS

The Desk Officer - Communication Room will be responsible for ensuring maintenance of DDCR facilities. All the desks would have:

  1. Intercom units for contact within the Collectorate for all Desk Officers in DDCR;
  2. Office space for secretarial facility should be clearly demarcated.

 

 

7.10 TRANSPORT FACILITY

A jeep with wireless communication would be assigned to DDCR during normal times. Additional vehicles will be requisitioned as per the requirements during the emergency.

 

 

7.11 DDCR STAFFING

Three kinds of staff is proposed for the DDCR:

  1. The regular staff should be posted permanently in the DDCR, who would be responsible for manning the Communication Room round the clock;
  2. Staff-on-call would be available for immediate duty in case of an emergency. Two officers of the rank of Deputy Collectors can make up the Staff-on-call during a disaster, these officers would always be available "on call".
  3. The staff on disaster duty would be required to shoulder additional responsibility in the case of a disaster. This additional staff would be of the nature of a reserve and may be drawn from the various departments. During normal time, this staff will not be called on to perform any duty in the DDCR. This staff would be responsible for managing the desk arrangements. Each concerned department should nominate one officer for DDCR. The departmental officers nominated as "Desk Officers" from the concerned line departments and other agencies will be available in the DDCR during the disaster period. All the important revenue officials in the district should be trained in the working of the DDCR. The nodal officers of other line departments would also be familiar with the functions of DDCR. The flow chart illustrating DDCR staffing for control & coordination is shown in Figure 3. The Standard Operating Procedure for the functioning of DDCR is placed at Annexure I

 

7.12 SITE OPERATION CENTER (SOC)

A Site Operation Centre (SOC) is also proposed as a complimentary unit to DDCR, which will operate close to the disaster site and will be linked directly with the district level control room (DDCR). Tehsildar will be the nodal officer from district administration at this level and would be responsible of coordinating at lowest level. The District Collector will also appoint an administrative officer to monitor and co-ordinate the activities of SOC as soon as possible. All information would be conveyed to the Collector from the Tehsildar through the administrative officer appointed at SOC. The tehsil unit of the respective vital departments would be responsible to execute activities at disaster site, however the tasks would be controlled and coordinated from DDCR through nodal desk officers.

 

In the event of a serious disaster, the Collector will have sole right to appoint senior officers of any State Government Department, posted in Rohtak as ‘Field Relief Managers’ for monitoring and co-ordinating the relief operations in the affected area.

The information flow between Disaster Operation Center (DOC), District Disaster Control Room (DDCR) and Site Operation center (SOC) is proposed in the form of flow chart, Figure 4.

 

7.13 REMARKS

There will be assigned various activities among different departments of the State government. The Departmental Manuals of these departments lay down the responsibilities of different officers, including responsibilities for preventing disasters and for initiating appropriate response activities in the event of a disaster. However, this plan will not restrict to the responsibilities prescribed in the respective departmental manuals. It makes an effort to provide an institutional mechanism for a quick and co-ordinated response. The officers of different resource organizations are expected to initiate action on their own in the event of a disaster or a threat of a disaster. But, they are certainly expected to keep the Collector and DDCR informed of the action being taken by them and act promptly as per the directions from the higher authority.

 

FLOOD DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN DISTRICT ROHTAK

 

GENERAL:

Rohtak district is situated on the west side of Delhi and surrounded by boundaries of district Jhajjar, Bhiwani, Hisar, Jind, Panipat and Sonepat. As per topography of Haryana State flood water in flow is mainly from North to South particularluy in this district. The rain water finds natural flow in to Rohtak district from the adjoining districts i.e. Panipat, Sonepat and Jind. The location of Rohtak Town and levels does not allow the gravity flow of the rain water into the nearby drains, but dewatering is being done through pumping and for that considering particular rainfall, the capacity of the pumps has been designed. In case there is heavy rainfall, then there is a flooding in most of the town area and that is why it has necessitated the Flood Disaster Management plan for Rohtak Town as well as surrounding areas, because district has face critical floods during 1960, 1962, 1967, 1977, 1983, 1987 and 1995.

 

PAST HISTORY:

As mentioned above, the district faced floods many time due to its topography and it took months to clear the floodwaters. The city is surrounded by Drain no.8 and JLN Feeder, which is one of the main canal of the State. Introspection of flood waters reveals that flood water has entered in Rohtak Town either from Drain no.8 or by crossing/ overtoppling the then low lying bund on the northern side connecting Gohana-Rohtak Railway line to Drain no.8 during 1995, due to choking of Diversion Drain no.8, the inlets on the right side started functioning due to rise in water level in Diversion Drain no.8 and then as per topography water started flowing was taken by Drain bo.8, but due to rise in water level in Drain no.8 there was a back flow and ultimately the sheet water touched the existing northern bund. Due to heavy rains in the first week of September, 1995. the flood waters ultimately overtopped the bund and water entered into the city area. Due to this natural inundation, there was approximately 10' water in depth in the heart of the city and town itself had to be vacated. Similar situation occurred due to breach in Drain no.8 during 1962. To clear the floodwaters, it took complete one month after putting all the resources available at the command of Rohtak district. Similarly, there was heavy flooding in the rural area particularly in Meham Sub Division, where it took approximately one year to clear the floodwaters. Like this, there was heavy damages caused by the floods in Rural as well as Urban areas. In nutshell, Rohtak town/Rohtak district itself is one the critical district so far as floods are concerned. To counteract these floods, various preventive measures have been taken which are discussed below :-

 

PREVENTIVE MEASURES:

The various preventive measures have been taken by various departments including the main two i.e. irrigation and Public Health Departments, responsible for tackling the floods.

1. DESIGN CRITERIA FOR FLOOD WORKS

The drains have been designed with the formula of 7 cusecs per sq. mile which can be attributed to rainfall of 22" to 25" and the flood waters can be cleared within six days except the pockets/ low lying area of which water can not be dewatered through gravity flow. So it is considered that except these pockets, there will be no damage to the crops in the area. It is pertinent to mention here that due to continuous flow irrigation through canals and tube-wells, the water table has come up and as a result there of the crop pattern in the area has also switched to rice mainly from wheat, Sugarcane, Jawar and Bajra. This has also become an additional factor for rise in water table. So the area is prone to floods. The main dewatering process for villages and fields is being taken by the irrigation department, whereas the dewatering process within municipal limits is being undertaken by the Public Health Department. The department has excavated number of drains in the area considering the disaster caused by floods of 1995.

 

2. INFRASTRUCTURE OF DRAINS

To make the district flood free, the rehabilitation of the existing drains has been under WRCP while most of the drains have been constructed under NABARAD project. During 1995, there was a sheet flow between drain no.8 and JLN Feeder, which ultimately entered in Rohtak town particularly. To counteract the same, Rohtak drain has been constructed which outfalls into Kultana-chhudani-Bhupania drain. The latter has also been rehabilitated which outfalls into Najafgarh drain and ultimately the water is discharged in River Yamuna. The list of the existing drain in Rohtak district is attached.

3. PROTECTION OF BUNDS

The protection bunds are maintained by the Additional Deputy Commissioner through concerned B.D. & P.O. every year. The detail of such bunds block-wise is given in Annexure-II.

4. DEWATERING ARRANGEMENTS AND AVAILABILITY OF MATERIAL AND MAN POWER

(A) Irrigation Department

The availability of pumping machinery and man power in the irrigation department is as under :-

I) Permanent Pump House

During the flood season, the primary responsibility of the irrigation department is to carry out dewatering of the flood waters affecting village abadies and fields. For this purpose, 10 nos. permanent pump houses having 273 cusecs capacity stand installed in order to provide relief to the village abadies, live stock and fields. The list of such pump houses is given in annexure - III

II) Mobile Pumps

Besides, some area which is not covered by these pump houses, mobile diesel pumping sets having 270 cs. capacity and electric pumping sets having 630 cs. capacity are also available in water services Mechanical Division, Rohtak for installation at various sites and ring bunds to protect abadies and fields from fury of floods as per site requirement. The list of the availability of mobile pumps is also attached herewith as Annexure-IV

III) Temporary Electric sites to be installed up to 30/6

In addition to above, some temporary electric sites as per list attached as Annexure-V stand already identified as vulnerable sites where electric pumping sets are installed before 30/6 every year which will start function as and when necessity arises.

IV) Deferred Electric Sites

Apart from this, there are some more temporary sites, the installation of which can be deferred due to site being approachable but electric connections are to be applied. These sites are to be installed during floods, if required. The list of such deferred sites is also enclosed herewith as

Annexure-VI

In addition to this, some more temporary sites are also installed in the fields according to the intensity of rains and requirement in the fields. So keeping in view the past experience, about 115 nos. electric and 130 nos. diesel sites will be installed in case of floods in the area. The sites to be installed are also depicted on the Index Plan attached herewith.

V Availability of Manpower

The details of man-power available in W.S. Mechanical Division, Rohtak is as under :-

1. Spl. Foreman - 1 no.

2. Asstt. Spl. F/man. - 1 no.

3. Foreman. - 7 nos.

4. Asstt. Foreman. - 6 nos.

5. Chargeman. - 5 nos.

6. Fitter - 13 nos.

7. Drageline Operator - 5 nos.

8. Dozer Operator - 1 no.

9. Tractor Operator - 3 nos.

10. Welder - 1 no.

11. Electrician - 1 no.

12. Ledger clerk - 1 no.

13. Tractor Trolla Opt. - 1 no.

14. Supervisor - 6 nos.

15. Asstt. Foreman. - 6 nos.

16. Driver. - 10 nos.

17. Pump Operator. - 46 nos.

18. Beldar. - 3 nos.

19. Chowkidars. - 55 nos.

20. Store keeper. - 2 nos.

21. Greaser. - 1 nos.

22. Cleaner - 8 nos.

23. T-mates. - 128 nos.

_______

Total 315 nos.

(B) By Public Health Department

For dewatering operation within Municipal limit is the responsibility of public Health department and for the said purpose, the following pumping sets have been installed:

Main disposal - 20 Cs.

Storm disposal - 26 Cs.

Harihjan Basti - 14 Cs.

HUDA Complex - 60 Cs.

Guru Nanakpuar - 10 Cs.

Nehru Colony - 12 Cs.

Model Town - 6 Cs.

Thus a total of 148 cs. capacity has been installed by public Health department for Rohtak Town. With urbanization of the town, the pondage area has also been depleted and the entire quantity of storm water has to be pumped out. The maximum accumulation of storm water takes place in Chhotu Ram Park area. It has a catchment area of 1200 acres and only 60 cusecs of pumping has been installed. Thus is case of 4" of rainfall in a day 300 acre feet of water would be collected and it would take 2 and day to clear the water.

Pumping Machinery

The following stand by pumps are also available for dewatering of flood water:

Electric Motors Pumping Sets

1. 50 HP 9 cs. 1no.

2. 35 HP 3.5 cs. 1no.

3. 35 HP 2 cs. 3nos.

4. 10 HP 1 cs. 3no.

Diesel Engine Driven Pumping sets.

1. 100 HP 9 cs. 1no.

2. 40 HP 5 cs. 1no.

3. 20 HP 2 cs. 2no.

4. 10 HP 1 cs. 3no.

During floods the following locations are likely to be affected:

- Dadu Wala Pond

- Widow Asharam

- Medical College

- New Friends Colony.

- Garhi Mohalla.

- Inner Pocket of Garhi mohalla.

- Janta Colony (kath Mandi area)

- Dairies behind Durga Mandir.

- Dev Colony

- Tilak Nagar/ Kamal Colony.

- Bharat Colony on Bye pass.

- Chankaya Puri on Bye pass.

- Nehru Nagar (Bye pass).

- Kailash Colony.

- Prem Nagar (Jail Road)

- Shakti Nagar (Chawla House)

- HSEB Sub Station office on Delhi-Hisar Sirsa Road.

- Gau karan Talab

- Guru Nanakpura.

- T.B. Hospital.

 

5 ARRANGEMENT OF MATERIAL AND MANPOWER

(I) Irrigation Department:

In case of floods, the material like Horizontal pumps, vertical pumps, HSD oil, M-oil and other accessories i.e. Heliflex pipe, fittings, E.C. bags and terpaulines etc. will be required.

The mobile will be arranged from the other offices of the department whereas vertical pumping sets will be arranged from HSMTC Karnal and lift pump houses situated at Dadri, Bhiwani, Rewari and Narnaul area. The name of the offices and various agencies along with their contact numbers are mentioned below:

 

S. Description of Name of Office/ Telephone Nos.

No. Material Agency

 

1. V.T. pumps/ -Xen. workshpp Dn. HSMTC Karnal. 282523

Mobile Pumps - Xen. W.S. Mech Dn. Rewari. 25025

and Manpower - Xen. W.S. Mech. Dn. Narnaul 50312

- Xen W.S. Mech Dn. Charkhi Dadri 20058

2. E.C. bags. - S.D.M. Rohtak 41068

3. Excavators. - Marshal Construction Co. Rohtak 75421

4. Pumps, - National Rubber Works Delhi. 3233114

Accessories 2814117

machine - Nagbro, Delhi. 3958636

parts. - International Trading, Delhi. 2960852

- Escorts JCB Ltd. Ballabgarh. 232308

- Durga Emergy, Co. Karnal 257115

- Guru Nanak Trading Corp. 222351

Jalandhar city. 243692

- Suchitra Sales Pvt. Ltd. 732873

Mani Majra Chandigarh. 734092

- Leo Earthmovers Pvt. Ltd. 6424981

Delhi.

- M.R.F. Ltd. Chennai. 8292774

- N.R. Gupta & Co. Rohtak 45176

- Kesri Oil Emporium, Delhi 3268342

- Sanjay Diesel, Delhi. 2967874

- Advance Engineering works. 5722150

New Delhi.

- Prestige Light Ltd., Rishikesh 432592

(Uttranchal) 430813

- Hindustan Associate Pvt. Ltd. 3321830

New Delhi. 3320077

 

The H.S.D. oil and M. oil will be arranged from Indian Oil Corporation. Regarding arrangement of material such PVC. heliflex pipe, pipe fittings, tarpaulines and other allied material will be done from the open market at Delhi through the purchase committee at District level. The E.C. bags will be arranged by the District Administration.

 

Manpower:

The skilled manpower will be arranged from HSMTC. and other lift divisions situated at Narnaul and Rewari.

 

ii) By Public Health Department

In order to ensure supply of water during floods about 30 no. tractor trolley tankers will be required. Besides, 10 pump of 2 cusecs and 10 pump of 1 cusec capacity are also required for dewatering process during floods.

 

6. MEASURES TO BE TAKEN DURING FLOODS BY EACH DEPTT.

For optimum efficiency, better communication system is required in order to have co-ordination of officers and officials at different level and for this purpose, the flood control rooms will be set up at various offices, the detail of which is given as under :-

1. -Deputy commissioner's office - 42222.

2. - Xen. water services Dn. Rtk - 44658.

3. -132-kva sub station, Khokhra

Kot Rohtak. - 43479

4. Operation Circle, UHEVN Rtk. - 44164

5. DRO office in Mini Secretriate - 41401.

6. DPRO - 42667

7. Tehsil Rohtak. - 41677

8. Tehsil Meham - 33044

9. Sub Tehsil Sampla. - 63258

10. Sub Tehsil Kalanaur - 22444

Wireless system if Police Deptt. will also be utilized.

ii) (By Irrigation Department)

During floods, watch and ward of the existing drains will be done to avoid any type of breach and pumping sets will also be installed at various sites according to the intensity of rains in order to provide relief to the village abadies/fields and live stock.

iii) (By Public Health Deptt.)

The superintending Engineer, Public Health Deptt. will make arrangement for carrying out chlorination of all rural water supply schemes in the days of floods. Arrangement for sufficient number ofhand pumps will bemade by the Public Health Deptt. which will be installed in flood affected villages as per existing situation during floods. Similarly, arrangement for digging of trench type latrines in villages will be made by Public Health Deptt. which could be used by marooned people.

The water supply to Rohtak Town is supplied from two no. water works i.e. Old Water works, Sonepat Road and 2nd Water Works at Jhajjar road. These water works have been protected from flooding.

IV) U.H.B.V.N.Deptt.

About 115 Nos. temporary flood connection will be required for abadi and fields dewatering for different load as per the intensity of the floods and the UHBVN divisions will be releasing the electric connections. The detail of such divisions is as under :

 

Sr. No.

Name of Division

Tel No.

1.

Operation Division , UHBVN, Rohtak

41915

2.

Operation Division , UHBVN, Gohana

52473

3.

Sub Urban Division , UHBVN Rohtak

44465

4.

Operation Division , UHBVN B/Garh.

310676

 

 

The flood connections applied by Irrigation deptt. and Public Health deptt. will be released well in time and power supply will be made available for flood connections as per requirement of the concerned departments.

 

V) Health Department :-

The civil surgeon, Rohtak will be responsible for ensuring Health Coverage, to the affected population. For this purpose, two major efforts will be required by the Civil Surgeon. Firstly to prevent the possibility of out break of Malaria, Cholera etc. Intensive anti malaria spray for which the District Medical Malaria Officer, Rohtak will be responsible Secondly , Medical relief will be provided in the flood affected villages both as preventive as well as curative measures. For this purpose, Civil Surgeon , Rohtak will make arrangement for B.M.Spray, Anti Malaria vaccine, Anti snakes vaccine, Halgen tablets and other essential medicines at the Civil Hospital , Rohtak, Meham, Kalanour, Samla, Chiri and Kiloi as well as District and Primary Health Centres. The following are the infrastructures available in the district;

 

Sr. No.

Infrastructure

Bed Strength

1.

General Hospital, Rohtak

85

2.

C.H.C, Meham

30

3.

C.H.C,Kalanour

30

4.

C.H.C.Sampla

8

5.

C.H.C.Chiri

8

6.

P.H.C.Kiloi

8

 

 

There are CHC's/PHC's situated at Block Level. There are sixteen P.H.C.'s situated in various villages i.e. Mokhra, Madina, Behlda, Girawar, Sanghi, Paksma, Bhalout, Ghilor Kalan, Hassangarh, Kharawar, Samargopalpur, Lakhan-Majra, Baland, Kahnour, Baniyani and Pilana. In some of these P.H.C'S beds are available. There are 113 sub centers situated in the villages of Rohtak district.

 

    1. Man Power :-
    2. At sub Centre level, one male and one female M.P.H.W. are working in the district.

      At P.H.C. level, one/two medical officer, Pharmacist, M.P.H.S(Male) and (Female), Supervisors are working.

      At .C.H.C level, one Senior Medical Officer, four medical officer, one Dental Surgeon, Ministrial staff and other staff as at P.H.C. level are working.

      At present, the following strength is available in Health Department.

      Sr. No..

      Health Department

      Strength

      1.

      S.M.O/P.O.

      14

      2.

      M.O.

      62

      3.

      Pharmacist

      41

      4.

      Staff Nurse/N.S.

      31

      5.

      M.P.H.S.(Male & Female)

      56

      6.

      M.P.H.W. (Male & Female )

      297

      7.

      L.T.

      28

      8.

      Class IV

      151

    3. Logestic :-
    4. One ambulance is available at C.H.C.Meham, At District H.Q. there is no ambulance available. 3 Ambulances are available with the District Red Cross Society.

    5. Medicines :-
    6. Medicines will be purchased for flood purpose from State H.Q. during floods general side medicines are also used. The drugs are procured from distributors of various firm located at Rohtak, Karnal , Ambala, Chandigarh and Delhi.

    7. Preparation for floods:-
    8. The following number of flood teams are constituted every year for medical relief work in flood affected area :

      Sr. No.

      Name of Block

      No. of Para-Medical Team

      No. of Medical Team

      1.

      Rohtak Town

      17

      -

      2.

      Kiloi

      33

      6

      3.

      Meham

      30

      5

      4.

      Kalanour

      36

      5

      5.

      Chiri

      24

      3

      6.

      Sampla

      24

      3

      VI) Animal Husbandry Department :-

      The Deputy Director Animal Husbandry, Rohtak will make elaborate arrangement for veterinary coverage of the entire animal population of the district. Sufficient quantities of preventive medicines like M.S.V., deworming tablets and FMBV etc. will be stoked by the Deputy Director , Animal Husbandry DDAH. Has intimated that almost the entire cattle population will be covered as a preventive measure. In case of need veterinary teams constituted by the DDAH will be pressed into service for providing veterinary coverage to the animal population in the district( List attached as Annexure –VII)

      VII) District Food and Supplies Controller :-

      The District Food and Supplies Controller, Rohtak will make elaborate arrangements for supply of essential commodities such as wheat-atta, rice, sugar, cooking oil, kerosene oil, petrol, diesel and tea leaves etc. in all the vulnerable villages. It will be the responsibility of District Food and Supplies Controller to ensure sufficient supply of these commodities in all the affected villages of the district through the existing network of fair price shops.

      VIII) District Education Officer, Rohtak:-

      District Education Officer, Rohtak will make available the school building which can be used as shelters for the flood affected population. The of such school building is enclosed herewith as Annexure-VIII

      ix) PWD B & R Department :-

      In case of floods, the following machinery and man-power available will be used :

      1. Trucks -6 Nos.

      2. Tractor -1 No.

      3. Detail of building which can be used as shelter - I.C. College, Rothak

      -I.T.I. Rohtak

      and various other building

      as per list attached as per

      Annexure –IX

      4. Man Power (Skilled)

      Masons -2 Nos.

      Carpanters -2 Nos.

      Painters -3 Nos.

      W/Washer -5 Nos.

      5. Unskilled man –power

      Beldars -126 Nos.

      6. Control Room - Office of Xen. Provincial

      Dn. No. I PWD B & R

      Branch Rohtak

        1. District Administration :-
        2. The following flood relief equipments are available with the S.D.M. (Rohtak):-

          Sr. No. Name of Flood Equipment Distt. Head Quarter Total

          1. Aluminium Boats 10 10

          2. Life Jackets 23 23

          3. O.B.M. 3 3

          4. Trailor 3 3

          5. Chappu 17 17

          6. Kunde 21 21

        3. Flood Warning System.:-

      The following are the places where wireless stations will set up by the Superintendent of Police , Rohtak :-

      Sr. No. Name of P.S. Station Location

      1. P.S. Sadar, Rohtak Sanghi Drain No. 8

      2. Sampla Dator Bandh Drain No. 6

      3. City Rohtak Hissar Bye Pass Drain No. 8

      4. City Rohtak Pathani Public Pathani Public

      School School

      5. Sadar Rohtak Sunderpur vill.

      Bridge Drain No. 8

      6. Civil Line Rohtak Ram Gopal Col. Ram Gopal Colony

      Rohtak (Bohar Drain)

      7. Kalanour Maraudi Bridge Drain No. 8

      8. Kalanour Ballam Bridge Drain No. 8

      9. Kalanour Kahnour Bridge Drain No. 8

      10. Kalanour Masoodpur pool Drain No. 8

      11. Kalanour Basana Village Village Basana

      Bus stand

      12. Kalanour Dadri feeder Dadri Feeder

      Village Sample

      13. Kalanour Dadri Feeder Pool Dadri Feeder

      14. Meham Madina Madina Canal Rest

      House

      15. Sadar, Rohtak Near Village Rohtak- Gohana

      Makroli Railway line,near

      Village Makroli

    9. Flood Control Room :-
    10. In addition to above, the District flood Control Room will be set up in the office of the Deputy Commissioner, Rohtak and each Tehsil Head Quarter w.e.f. 1.7.2001. The district revenue officer will be officer in charge of the district flood control room.

          1. INDIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY, ROHTAK

The followings are organization whose help can be got extended during the floods with men and material :-

  1. Indian Red Cross Society, Rohtak
  2. St. John Ambulance Association, Rohtak
  3. Manav Sewa Sangh , Rohtak
  4. Nav Yuak Kala Sangam, Rohtak
  5. Haryana Lok Sanskritik Manch, Rohtak
  6. Bharat Vikas Parishad, Rohtak
  7. Lions Club , Rohtak
  8. Rotary Club, Rohtak
  9. Indian Medical Association, Rohtak
  10. Haryana Telecom Ltd, Rohtak
  11. Bharat Rasyan Ltd, Mokhra
  12. Sant Nirankari Mandal, Rohtak
  13. Baba Banda Bahdur Sewa Dal, Rohtak
  14. Sati Bhai Sain Dass Sewa Dal, Rohtak
  15. Math Asthal Bohar, Rohtak
  16. Haryana Rural Farmers Development Association, Rohtak
  17. Sarve Haryana Saini Sabha, Rohtak
  18. Durga Colony Welfare Assocation, Rohtak
  19. Jan Sewa Samiti, Rohtak
  20. Jan Kalyan Samiti, Rohtak
  21. Gohana Road Traders Association, Rohtak
  22. Gurudwara Prabandhak Samiti, Rohtak
  23. Daya Nand Math, Rohtak
  24. Sanatan Dharam Sabha, Rohtak
  25. Shrinagar Colony Welfare Sabha, Rohtak
  26. Truck Union, Rohtak
  27. Haryana Marketing , Board
  28. Aggarwal Sabha, Railway Road, Bahadurgarh
  29. Nehra Yuva Kendra, Rohtak
  30. Saksarta Samita, Rohtak
  31. N.C.C./N.,S.S Units, M.D.U.Rohtak
  32. Laxmi Roller Flour Mills, Rohtak
  33. Yuva Jagriti Club, Kalanour
  34. Indian Red Cross Society, Distt. Branch Panipat, Faridabad, Gurgaon, Sirsa, Karnal, Ambala, Kurukshetra and Narnoul.

 

ANNEXURE-III

 

DETAIL OF PERMANENT PUMP HOUSES SHOWING NO. OF PUMPS ALONGWITH THEIR CAPACITY IN DISTT. ROHTAK

 

Sr. No.

Name of Pump House

No. of pumps

Total Capacity

1.

Chiri pump house at RD 43120- Kahnaur Disty.

3

15 CS.

2.

Madina pump house at RD-85315 Bhiwani Sub Branch

4

30 CS.

3.

Rithal pump house at RD-93500 Left B.S.B.

6

45 CS.

4.

RD-93500- Right JLN Feeder

1

5 CS.

5.

RD –103000- Right JLN Feeder

1

5 CS.

6.

Dhammar pump house at RD 111800- Right JLN Feeder

3

15 CS.

7.

Ladhot pump house at RD 119700 – Right JLN Feeder

3

15 CS.

8.

Kiloi pump house at RD 117800- left BSB

3

15 CS.

9.

Sampla pump house (left) at RD 55500- Dulhera Disty

7

90 CS.

10.

Sampla pump house (right) at RD 55500- Dulhera Disty.

5

38 CS.

 

 

 

ANNEXURE –IV

 

DETAIL OF FLOOD POOL DIESEL AND ELECTRIC PUMPING SETS AVAILABLE FOR DISTRICT ROTHAK

 

Sr No.

Type of Pumps

No. of Pumps

Capacity of each pump

Total Capacity

1.

  1. Diesel Pumping Sets
  2. TV 2

    Chhota Jawan

    Total

114

21

135

2 CS.

2 CS.

228 CS.

    1. 42 CS

270 CS.

2.

  • Electric Pumping sets
  • 3 CS. Cap.

    5 CS. Cap

    10 CS. Cap.

    3 CS. Cap.(ver)

    5 CS. Cap. (ver)

    10 C.S. Cap. (ver)

    Total

83

33

2

2

24

7

151

3

5

10

3

5

10

 

249 CS.

165 CS.

20 CS.

6 CS.

120 CS.

70 CS

630 CS.

 

 

 

Availability of Generating Sets.

 

1. Generating Set 60 KVA. 2 Nos.

 

2. Generating Set 150 KVA. 1 No. (With Xen. Sample Water Services

Division , Rohtak)

Tel . No. 44641

 

ANNEXURE -V

 

 

DETAIL OF TEMPORARY ELECTRIC DEWATERING SITES WHICH ARE INSTALLED UPTO 30/6 EVERY YEAR.

 

  1. Kanheli link drain outfalling into drain no. 8.
  2. Kanheli link drain near Village Kanheli.
  3. RD 107000- Left of Bhallout Sub Branch
  4. RD 31000- Left of Kahnaur Disty.
  5. Ritauli pump house link drain.
  6. Tilyar pump house link drain.
  7. Madina pump house link drain (2nd stage)
  8. RD 46000 Left Dulhera Disty for Village Ishmaila.
  9. Ajaid-Bharan link drain RD 100 of Meham drain.
  10. South Behlba dewatering site RD 80 Meham drain.
  11. RD 56 – Left of Meham drain for village Mokhra.
  12. RD 61- of Bhiwani Sub Branch for Village Kharainti.
  13. RD 16000- Left Kalanour minor for Village Mokhra.
  14. RD 122- Left of Bhiwani Disty.
  15. RD 122- Right of Bhiwani Disty.

 

ANNEXURE-VI

DETAIL OF TEMPORARY ELECTRIC DEWATERING SITES TO BE DEFERRED BUT ELECTRIC CONNECTION ARE TO BE APPLIED.

 

  1. Bhalli- Anandpur pump house link drain.
  2. RD 59500-L Kahnaur Disty.
  3. Village Karor/ Kehrawer. left and right of Dulhera Disty.
  4. RD 12-13 Chiri Minor.
  5. RD 137000- Right JLN Feeder.
  6. RD 164000- Right JLN Feeder crossing Jhajjar Road.
  7. RD 101- Right Bhiwani Sub Branch for Village Kharkhara.

 

 

SUB-PLANS

  1. REVENUE DEPARTMENT
  2. 1. INTRODUCTION

    The Revenue Department is the nodal agency for providing relief to the people affected by natural calamities. The Revenue Book Circular 6-4 contains instructions for providing the ex-gratia payment to the people affected by natural calamities. But the Field Officers of the Revenue Department, like the District Collector and Sub Divisional Officers, also perform the general administration functions of coordinating with other Government departments. In case of a disaster, the affected people need not only ex-gratia payments, but also the medical relief, search, rescue of the trapped people, and preventive action to check outbreak of epidemic, security of the people, etc. is also required.

    The District Collector, being the District Relief Manager, is responsible for not only providing the ex-gratia payment on behalf of the Revenue Department but is also responsible for ensuring the general preparedness of all the Government agencies and a coordinated response of all the agencies in case of disaster. The operating procedure for the Revenue Department, therefore, seeks to take care of all these responsibilities.

    The District Collector will not only be himself be aware of the essential elements of District Disaster Management Plan but will also make all the Revenue Officers of the District aware about of the essential elements of the Plan. For this purpose, he will organize a refresher training of all Revenue Officers in the month of May every year.

    1.2 PURPOSE OF SUB-PLAN:

    The Sub-Plan is meant to ensure:

    ??Quick and effective performance of function

    ??Easy reference for coordination of response actions.

    2. PREPAREDNESS ACTION:

    2.1 The District Collector will ensure that he receives the preparedness reports from all the concerned Government departments in June every year and will convene a meeting of the district Crisis Group in the first week of July every year to review the preparedness for floods and earthquakes.

    2.2 The District Collector will prepare and maintain a resource inventory of all the trained manpower, equipment and material needed for different response functions in case of flood and earthquake in the district. He will ensure that the concerned departments validate and update the resource inventory in June every year and will send a preparedness report to the Relief Commissioner in July every year.

    2.3 He will appoint the Desk Officers for Disrict Emergency Control Room in consultation with the District Crisis Group members in July every year so that in case of an emergency, these Desk Officers can immediately assume their charge and the DDCR becomes fully operational.

    3. OPERATIONAL TASKS

    3.1 The Revenue Department is responsible for the following functions:

    (a) Operation of the District Control Room;

    (b) Distribution of ex-gratia payment to affected people;

    (c) Running of Relief Centres;

    (d) Financial management of different components of response operations;

    (e) Procurement of equipment and material needed by different response agencies from Government departments, the local community and the local market;

    (f) Receipt and utilization of donated material for the relief of the affected people;

    (g) Agencies for immediate mobilization;

    3.2 OPERATIONAL CONTROL:

    The District Collector will be the overall incharge of the activities for the management of disaster.

    4. RESOURCES AVAILABLE:

    The name, address and telephone numbers of the revenue officers will be maintained in the DDCR and the concerned Tehsil Office and Collectorate for mobilization of the same.

    5. ACTIVATION GUIDELINE AND TASK ALLOCATION:

    On the occurrence of an earthquake, the Collector will immediately convene a meeting of the District Crisis Group members at the DDCR and will make a preliminary assessment of the situation, issue instructions of different response Assess the availability of response with the agencies and take decision regarding supplementing the resources from other departments.

    The Collector and the concerned Sub Divisional Officer will reach the affected area as soon as possible for coordinating relief operations and will maintain contact with the DDCR through wireless or other communication medium and coordinate response of different agencies.

    6. DIRECTION AND COORDINATION:

    In the absence of District Collector from the district headquarter, OIC-DDCR will be responsible for coordination between different response agencies.

    7. OPERATION COMPLETE

    The District Collector, after completion of the entire task assigned to all the departments relating to immediate response, will take a briefing session with all officers of the rank of Executive Engineers above. He will send a brief report to the Divisional Commissioner which will include an expenditure statement including the debris case and establishment of the centers and construction of the diversion for ensuring communication in the affected areas and other measures taken.

    Checklist no .1 (to be filled by District Collector in the month of May)

    S. No.

    Action

    Remarks

    yes/ no

    1

    A meeting of the district Crisis Group held in first week of July to review the preparedness for floods and earthquakes.

     

    2

    Received the preparedness reports from all the concerned Government departments this year.

     

    3

    The concerned departments validated and updated the resource inventory in June this year and sent a preparedness report to the Relief Commissioner

     

    4

    Prepared and maintained a resource inventory of all the trained manpower, equipment and material needed for different response functions in case of flood and earthquake in the district

     

    5

    Appointed the Desk Officers for DDCR in consultation with the District Crisis Group members in July

     

    Date Signature

    Checklist no .2 (to be filled by District Collector after activation of DDCR)

    S. No.

    Action

    Remarks

    yes/ no

    1

    All the officers of the department of the rank of Nayab Tahsildar and above reported with the DDCR through the Deputy Collector and took instructions?

     

    2

    Information regarding the road communication available, construction of the diversion and other structures for communication of the affected area taken?

     

    3

    Whether survey teams for identification of unsafe buildings both private and Government who need to be demolished in the interest of the public safety constituted and report sent to DDCR?

     

     

    Date Signature

  3. SUB-PLAN FOR POLICE

1.1 Introduction

Police is the leading agency, which works under the operational control of the District Superintendent of Police. Hazard analysis of Rohtak district indicates that there is risk of earthquake and flood. In view of hazard scenario in the district, the role of Police department will include:

  1. Evacuation of people from low lying areas on receipt of flood warning
  2. Supplement resources of Homeguards for search, rescue and evacuation operations.
  3. Security of the property of affected people and law and order maintenance in affected area.
  4. ?Traffic management leading to affected area.
  5. To ensure Essential Commodity Act.

 

1.2 Within the administrative structure prevalent in the district, Police organization utilizes the services of its SAF, Homeguards to supplement the manpower resources of the Police Department in the maintenance of law & order.

 

 

1.3 Purpose of Sub-Plan:

The Sub-Plan is meant to ensure:

  1. Quick and effective performance of function
  2. Easy reference for coordination of response actions

 

 

2.1 Preparedness Action:

Being a key response organization in the district, it is vital that this organization remains in a state of preparedness to ensure its general readiness to respond to a disaster situation. The District Superintendent of Police will ensure the execution of following action and send compliance to the District Collector in the first week of June every year, in the format mentioned in Checklist 3.

  1. Orientation training will be organized every year for the purpose in the month of April;
  2. The department will include inputs relating to the hazards identified in Chapter
  3. No 4 of the Plan in the regular training module of the volunteers in the district;
  4. The department will organize one refresher training for its volunteers at least once in every financial year;
  5. The department will organize a simulation exercise in May every year for both its regular officers and the volunteers;

 

Operational task and control:

 

3.1 Tasks

The department of Police will be responsible for performing the following functions:

  1. Search, rescue and Evacuation of persons on receipt of warning for flood or occurrence of a disaster;
  2. First aid to the injured people in the absence of the medical relief team.
  3. Security of the property, and law and order maintenance in affected area.
  4. Traffic management leading to affected area.
  5. To ensure enforcement of Essential Commodity Act.
  6. Investigation of offences.

 

 

3.2 Operations Control

The search and rescue teams of the Polices will function under the operational control of the District Superintendent of Police. District Superintendent of Police will deploy his teams for the evacuation operations and other functions.

 

4.1 Resources Available:

4.2 Supplementary Resources:

The agency will also identify the additional manpower resource that may be called upon by the District Magistrate to supplement the manpower resource in case of an emergency. Homeguards also act as supplementary resource.

 

5.1 Activation Guidelines:

The District Magistrate through the District Emergency Control Room will issue the instructions to the Superintendent of Police, Rohtak.

 

5.2 Operation coordination

  1. The Superintendent of Police, Rohtak will immediately instruct all the police stations of the district to communicate the message to the Police in their respective areas. A radio announcement for the same can also be done for effective communication.
  2. The District Superintendent of Police Rohtak will also workout a deployment plan for the Polices keeping in view the disaster situation and will make arrangements for the transport of the Police to their duty point.
  3. The Police called for duty will immediately report to the Station House Officer (SHO), Reserve line of their respective police station.
  4. SHO will make arrangements for transport of the Polices.

 

 

6. Direction and coordination:

 

Receipt of warning

On receiving the alert message for readiness from the DDCR, Superintendent of Police, Rohtak will immediately put on alert the Police on duty and the key officials of his agency. Security of property, wireless communication availability, immediate assessments of the situation are to be done immediately.

For ensuring quick mobilization and deployment of the resources of the Police department a checklist for the Superintendent of Police, Rohtak is indicated in checklist 4, which he will fill up and send to the District Magistrate through the DDCR.

 

7. Operational Checklist:

Once the combat operations have started the District Superintendent of police would be required to assess the activation and operational procedure followed by the department. Assessment should be done based on criteria mentioned in Checklist 4.

 

 

 

8.1 Task allocation

The senior most executive Magistrate present on the spot will take decisions regarding assignment of task to Police team for various operations in the affected areas and in the absence of an Executive Magistrate on the spot.

 

 

9.Operation completion

The Police team will send task completion report to the District Magistrate through Disaster Emergency Control Room as soon as the task is over. The task completion report will indicate the number of injured people and the number of people still trapped inside the debris.

On completion of all the tasks relating to search, rescue and evacuation assigned to the Police by the District Magistrate, the Superintendent of Police, Rohtak will take a briefing session with Station House Officers and submit a briefing report to the District Magistrate. It can be in the same format as checklist 5.

Checklist 3

 

To be filled by District Superintendent of police in the month of may.

S. No.

Action

Remarks

Yes/ no

1.

All the regular officers of the organization are made aware of the responsibilities of Polices department in disaster management

 

2.

Orientation training was organized this year for the purpose in the month of April.

 

3.

The department has provided the regular training to volunteers in combat operations with respect to earthquake and flood

 

4.

The department has organized refresher training for its volunteers at least once in last financial year

 

5

The department has conducted a simulation exercise in May this year for both its regular officers and the volunteers

 

 

 

Designation Date Signature

 

Checklist 4

 

To be filled by District Superintendent of police after activation of DDCR.

S. No.

Action

Remarks

yes/ no

1.

All police officers, including SAF officers, stationed in the district reported to the collector

 

2.

Radio communication established with State Emergency Operation Centre, Divisional commissioner, District emergency control room, all the Police Station are put on full alert.

 

3.

Guards provided as needed for supply depots such as cooperative food stores and distribution centres, security of relief centres, medical relief centres, affected area, relief supplies.

 

4.

Strict enforcement of Essential Commodities Act ensured to check black marketing

 

5

Anti social elements identified and necessary precautionary measures taken for confidence building

6

Overall traffic management and patrolling on highway and other access road to disaster site

7

Officers made available to inquire into and record deaths, there may not be time or adequate manpower available to carry out standard postmortem procedures, hence made arrangement for postmortem in sample cases

8

A public information centre activated to respond to personal enquiries about the safety of relatives in the affected areas

9

Investigation of offences started

 

Designation Date Signature

 

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR HOME GUARDS

1.1 Introduction

Homeguards is the leading combat agency, which works under the operational control of the police and overall administrative control of the District Collector. Hazard analysis of Rohtak district indicates that there is risk of earthquake and flood. In view of hazard scenario in the district, the role of Homeguards department will include:

  1. Search & rescue of people in collapsed buildings after an earthquake.
  2. Evacuation of people from low lying areas on receipt of flood warning
  3. Rescue of people from floodwaters

 

1.2 Within the administrative structure prevalent in the district, homeguard organization utilizes the services of its local volunteers to supplement the manpower resources of the Police Department in the maintenance of law & order, search, rescue and evacuation operations in case of disaster. The organization has regular trainers who train the volunteers in combat operations viz. search, rescue, fire fighting and evacuation operations.

 

1.3 Purpose of Sub-Plan:

The sub-plan is meant to ensure:

  1. Quick and effective performance of function
  2. Easy reference for coordination of response actions

 

 

2.2 Preparedness Action:

Being a key response organization in the district, it is vital that this organization remains in a state of preparedness to ensure its general readiness to respond to a disaster situation. The District Commandant, Homeguard will ensure the execution of following action and send compliance to the District Collector in the first week of June every year, in the format mentioned in Checklist 5.

a) Orientation training will be organized every year for the purpose in the month of April;

b) The department will include inputs relating to the hazards identified in Chapter No.4 of the Plan in the regular training module of the volunteers in the district;

c) The department will organize one refresher training for its volunteers at least once in every financial year;

d) The department will organize a simulation exercise in May every year for both its regular officers and the volunteers;

e) The department will verify stock of equipment and material available with the agency for performing its function as per the District Emergency Management Plan in May every year. The department will also evaluated and update the resource data base for meeting the requirement of manpower, equipment and material for performing the functions assigned to the agency in District Emergency Management Plan in May every year.

 

Operational task and control:

 

 

3.1 Tasks

The department of Homeguard will be responsible for performing the following functions:

a) Evacuation of persons on receipt of warning for flood or occurrence of a disaster;

b) Search and rescue of the injured, trapped and marooned people;

c) First aid to the injured people in the absence of the medical relief team.

d) Once the search, rescue and evacuation operations are over, the District Magistrate can also utilize the manpower resource of homeguards department for assisting in the distribution of relief material.

 

 

3.2 Operations Control

The search and rescue teams of the Homeguards will function under the operational control of the Platoon Commandant. The District Commandant will deploy these teams for the search, rescue and evacuation operations.

 

 

4.1 Resources Available:

The organization should maintain an appropriate inventory of the equipment and material as mentioned in Table 1 below:

 

 

Table 1: Department resource details.

Sr. No.

Name of Equipment

Quantity

Sr. No.

Name of Equipment

Quantity

1

Picket

 

10

Ladder

 

2

Spade

 

11

First-aid box

 

3

Axe

 

12

Fiber helmet

 

4

Saw

 

13

Torch

 

5

Extension ladder

 

14

Water bottle

 

6

Gas lantern

 

15

Rope

 

7

Stretcher

 

16

Tarpaulin

 

8

Wooden box

 

17

Utensils

 

9

Bucket

 

18

Blanket

 

 

 

The organization will maintain the above resource inventory database in the prescribed format.

 

 

4.2 Manpower available:

The district has a sanctioned strength of 320 Homeguards (2 companies). Normally one company is deployed for law & order duty in the district. A resource database of number of skilled personnel in combat operations available in the department should be developed by the department and periodically updated.

 

 

4.3 Supplementary Resources:

The department will not only maintain the inventory data base of equipment, material and vehicle mentioned in Table No.1, but will also try to seek the assistance of District Crisis Group in locating additional resource of equipment and material available with local community and market. The department will work out an arrangement for procuring the same. The District Collector will be requested to procure additional resources for meeting the requirements of the agency.

The agency will also identify the additional manpower resource that may be called upon by the District Magistrate to supplement the manpower resource in case of an emergency. The details of the additional manpower resource will be maintained in the same format as mentioned in Manpower inventory placed at Annexure ---.

Public Works Department (PWD) will provide the necessary support to the Homeguard team for debris clearance for search, rescue and evacuation operations and the Water Resource Department, as the case may be, will provide necessary support for search, rescue and evacuation operations in case of flood.

 

 

5.1 Activation Guidelines:

The district has a sanctioned strength of 320 Homeguards (2 companies). Normally one company is deployed for law & order duty in the district. The District Magistrate is competent to call out both the companies for 15 days for law & order duty and the Divisional Commissioner can call out both the companies for 30 days. Though the Homeguards organization maintains Reserve line but it is not as equipped as the Reserve Police line. The District Magistrate will be competent to call out both companies of the agencies for 15 days for disaster management duties.

??The District Magistrate through the District Emergency Control Room will issue the instructions to a District Commandant, Homeguards, Rohtak with a copy to the Superintendent of Police, Rohtak.

 

 

5.2 Operation coordination

  1. The Superintendent of Police, Rohtak will immediately instruct all the police stations of the district to communicate the message to the Homeguard Volunteers in their respective areas. A radio announcement for the same can also be done for effective communication.
  2. The District Commandant, Rohtak will also workout a deployment plan for the Homeguards keeping in view the disaster situation and will make arrangements for the transport of the Homeguard Volunteers to their duty point.
  3. The Homeguard Volunteers called for duty will immediately report to the Station House Officer (SHO) of their respective police station.
  4. SHO will make arrangements for transport of the Homeguards.

 

 

6. Direction and coordination:

Receipt of warning

On receiving the alert message for readiness from the DDCR, the District Commandant, Homeguards will immediately put on alert the Homeguard volunteers on duty and the key officials of his agency.

??The District Commandant will also ensure the immediate stock verification of the equipment and material required for search, rescue and operation.

??The District Commandant will remain in touch with the District Magistrate and Superintendent of Police for the deployment of his resource for search, rescue and evacuation operations. For ensuring quick mobilization and deployment of the resources of the homeguard department a checklist for the District Commandant, is indicated at checklist 6, Which he will fill up and send to the District Magistrate through the DDCR.

 

 

7. Operational Checklist:

Once the combat operations have started the District Commandant would be required to assess the activation and operational procedure followed by the department. Assessment should be done based on criteria mentioned in Checklist 6.

 

 

8.1 Task allocation

The senior most executive Magistrate present on the spot will take decisions regarding assignment of task to Homeguard team for search, rescue and evacuation operations in the affected areas and in the absence of an Executive Magistrate on the spot, the Homeguard Team undertake decisions regarding search, rescue and evacuation. Once the task is assigned, the Homeguard team will follow the following drill:

 

 

8.2 Survey:

Rescue is done under trying conditions. The rescue team leader needs to quickly assess the situation and mobilize the resources for timely and effective rescue. For this surveys are of great help preliminary survey: The leader reaches the site, notes down important points and orders the rescue party for work.

 

Detailed survey:

The leader makes primary plan and rescue is started. The rescued victims are asked about the location of the rest of the victims and then the resources are mobilized for their rescue. The water, electricity connections are cut-off so that rescuers and victims are not further endangered. After the survey the buildings are marked suitably to avoid duplication of job.

 

 

8.3 Stages of rescue:

Surface area casualty is removed and first aid is administered. Water, electric supply are cut-off. The casualty under damaged structure are searched and rescued. Casualty in voids and debris are searched and rescued. Selected debris is removed. Total debris is removed.

 

 

8.4 Do’s and Don’ts of rescue

What rescuer should do.

  1. Keep calm all the time.
  2. Do survey work before starting the work.
  3. After removing injured person from the site immediately give first aid except for case of very serious casualty.
  4. It is difficult to remove injured person from the site he should be saved from falling debris with blanket or tarpaulin.
  5. Remove debris adjacent to victim carefully
  6. Keep the victim warm, treat for shock
  7. Use cutting equipment carefully
  8. Administer water to casualty before removing from site.
  9. While working on upper your to be as wear as possible to the wall.
  10. Management for treatment of casualties

 

What rescuer should not do:

  1. Don’t remove casualty without administering unless be is in a very serious condition
  2. Don’t walk over the debris unless very necessary
  3. Don’t touch wires
  4. Don’t remove wooden plank from damaged building, it may lead to collapse.

The above procedure is to be carried out at the site, following checklist no. 3 will ensure that task is completed in correct way. The company Commander can fill this checklist and give to the District Commandant along with debriefing report.

 

 

9.Operation completion Report:

The Homeguard team will send task completion report to the District Magistrate through Disaster Emergency Control Room as soon as the task is over. The task completion report will indicate the number of injured people and the number of people still trapped inside the debris.

On completion of all the tasks relating to search, rescue and evacuation assigned to the Homeguard by the District Magistrate. The District Commandant will take a briefing session with his Company Commandants and Platoon Commandants and submit a briefing report to the District Magistrate with copies to the Superintendent of Police and Divisional Commandant. It can be in the same format as checklist 6.

Checklist 5

 

To be filled by District Commandant in the month of may.

S. No.

Action

Remarks

yes/ no

1

All the regular officers of the organization are made aware of the responsibilities of homeguards department in disaster management

 

2

Orientation training was organized this year for the purpose in the month of April

 

3

The department has provided the regular training to volunteers in combat operations with respect to earthquake and flood

 

4

The department has organized refresher training for its volunteers at least once in last financial year

 

5

The department has conducted a simulation exercise in May this year for both its regular officers and the volunteers

 

 

Designation Date Signature

 

Checklist 6

 

To be filled by District Commandant after activation of DDCR.

S. No.

Action

Remarks

yes/ no

1

The Superintendent of Police, Rohtak was requested for giving instruction to all the police stations of the district to communicate the message to the Homeguard Volunteers in their respective areas to join duty

 

2

The Homeguard team has sent interim task status report to the District Magistrate through Disaster Emergency Control Room

 

3

A debriefing report of the task completion given to the District Magistrate with copies to the Superintendent of Police and Divisional Commissioner

 

 

 

Designation Date Signature

 

 

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND FAMILY WELFARE DEPARTMENT (PHFWD)

1.1 Introduction

Major disasters like flood or earthquake result in injuries to people or may cause epidemics. The PHFWD is responsible for not only preventing the outbreaks of epidemics but also for providing immediate medical relief to the affected people in a disaster. The department works under some constraints even during normal times because of the population pressure, poverty and the resource crunch with the department. Therefore, the standard operating procedure for the department seeks to ensure that department is able to discharge the responsibilities for providing the immediate medical relief and for preventing outbreak of the epidemic in the affected areas despite resource constraints experienced by it during normal times.

 

 

1.2 Purpose of Sub-Plan:

The sub-plan is meant to ensure:

  1. Quick and effective performance of function
  2. Easy reference for coordination of response actions.

 

 

2.0 Preparedness Action:

The department will ensure that all the medical doctors are aware about the responsibilities of the department in case of a disaster and all the manpower of the department, including para medical staff, are sensitized regarding the need for maximum efficiency during disaster situation. This should be achieved by organizing orientation training for the staff in the month of May every year.

The department should also identify sources from which it can procure the additional equipment and materials on a very short notice to supplement its resources. The inventory of all such resources should be maintained in the resource database. This database should be validated and updated in May every year. The department should train local Volunteers in preventive medicine in the area identified as vulnerable to floods and in first aid in areas identified as vulnerable to earthquakes. Chief Medical and Health Officers (CMHO) of district will send preparedness report to the District Collector for rural area and Civil Surgeon will also send preparedness report in respect of the district hospital.

The department is responsible for providing the medical relief to the people affected from flood or earthquake and is also responsible for prevention of outbreak of epidemics.during preparedness

_ Surgical packs should be assembled and sterilized. A large enough number should be sterilized to last four to five days. The sterilized surgical packs must be stored in protective cabinets to ensure that they do not get wet. Covering the stock with polythene is recommended as an added safety measure.

_ All valuable instruments, such as surgical tools, opthalmoscopes, portable sterilizes, CGS, dental equipments, etc., should be packed in protective coverings and stored rooms considered being the most damage-proof.

_ The emergency electrical generator should be checked to ensure that it is operational and that a buffer stock of fuel exists. If an emergency generator is not available at the hospital, arrange for one on loan.

_ All fracture equipment should be readied. If surgery is to be performed following the disaster, arrange for emergency supplies of anesthetic gases (usually supplied on a daily basis).

  1. Stocks of equipments and drugs which are likely to be most needed after the disaster should be checked. These can be categorized generally as:
  2. Drugs used in treatment of cuts and fractures, such as tetanus toxoid, analgesies and antibiotics.
  3. Drugs used for the treatment of diarrhea, Water-borne diseases and flu (including oral rehydrating supplies).
  4. Drugs required treating burns and fighting infections.
  5. Drugs needed for detoxification including breathing equipments.

 

The department should identify the trained manpower, the equipment and the material required for discharging the responsibilities assigned under the District Emergency Management Plan and prepare an inventory of the same. It should also try to identify the external sources in the community and the market for procuring the same with the assistance of the District Crisis Group. The CMHO should ensure compliance of all the points mentioned above and send a compliance report to the District Collector in may every year as per checklist

 

Checklist 7

 

3.1 Operational tasks and control

The department is responsible for the following.

  1. Providing efficient and quick treatment.
  2. Preventing outbreak of epidemics.

 

3.2 Operational control

On receipt of a warning of an impending flood from the DDCR, CMHO will immediately put his doctors and the paramedical staff on alert for preventing outbreak of epidemic. It will constitute medical teams for the survey in the affected area and for decontamination of drinking water sources. In case of occurrence of an earthquake all the staff of the department will immediately report for duty in the concerned Family Health Centre / District Hospital or the health sub centre, as the case may be. The medical staff will immediately try to reach the affected area and provide the medical relief. The CMHO will try to mobilize additional manpower from the area not affected by earthquake to supplement the local resources of the affected area. Checklist for CMHO is given as checklist 8.

 

 

4.1 Resources available:

The name, address and telephone numbers of the Doctors, para medical staff will be maintained in the DDCR and the concerned Tehsil Office and Collectorate for mobilization of the same. The following equipment and material list is given as example of resources to be kept in stock.

 

4.2 Supplementary resources:

The CMHO will identify the external sources in the community and the market for procuring the equipment and medicine with the assistance of the District Crisis Group. In case of a disaster the CMHO can request the services of the medical officers working in Red Cross, Private Doctors, Nursing Homes and Doctors in District Hospital and during the period of such requisition those medical officers can work under the administrative control of CMHO. A list of blood donors should also be with the CMHO.

 

 

5.1 Activation Guideline:

CMHO will receive the message from DDCR and immediately put his doctors and the paramedical staff on alert. All the staff will seek instruction from District Collector through CMHO. The CMHO will call doctors using name and address list of doctors in his office. An announcement to this effect can be broadcasted on radio, Television.

 

 

6.1 Direction and coordination:

  1. Determine type of injuries/illnesses expected and drugs and other medical items required, and accordingly ensure that extra supplies of medical items be obtained quickly provide information to all hospital staff about the disasters, likely damages and effects, and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.
  2. Discharge all ambulatory patients whose release does not pose a health risk to them. If possible, they should be transported to their home areas.
  3. Non-ambulatory patients should be relocated to the safest areas within the hospital. The safest rooms are likely to be:
  4. ??One ground floor

    ??Rooms in the centre of the building away from windows

    ??With concrete ceilings.

  5. Assess the level of medical supplies in stock, including:
  6. ??Fissure materials

    ??Surgical dressings

    ??Splints

    ??Plaster rolls

    ??Disposable needles and syringes

    ??Local antiseptics.

  7. Request resources identified to immediately dispatch of supplies likely to be needed, to hospitals, on an emergency priority basis
  8. Fill hospitals water storage tanks and encourage water savings. If no storage tanks exist, water for drinking should be drawn in clean containers and protected.
  9. Prepare an area of the hospital for receiving large number of casualties
  10. Develop emergency admission procedures (with adequate record keeping).

 

 

6.2 Task allocation:

CMHO will establish work schedules to ensure that adequate staff is available for in-patient needs. He will organize in-house emergency medical teams to ensure that adequate staff is available at all times to handle emergency casualties. He will set up teams of doctors, nurses and dressers for providing services at disaster sites. Once the task is allocated the team will follow below mentioned procedure.

 

 

6.3 For earthquake:

Tagging

Tagging is a process of prioritizing transfer of injured, based on first hand assessment of the medical officer on the disaster site. It is based on the medical criterion of chance of survival. Decision is made regarding cases, which can wait for treatment, these, which should be taken to more appropriate medical units, and these which have no chances of surviving. The grouping is based on the benefit that the casualties can expect to derive from medical care, not on the seriousness of injuries. Whenever possible, the identification of patients should be accomplished concurrently with triage. Attaching a tag to each patient usually color-coded to indicate a given degree of injury and the priority for evacuation does this.

This tag signifies that the patient has first priority for evacuation. Red-tagged patients need immediate care and fall into one of the following categories:

1. Breathing problems that cannot be treated at the site.

2. Cardiac arrest (witnessed).

3. Appreciable losses of blood (more than a liter).

4. Loss of consciousness.

5. Thoracic perforations or deep abdominal injuries.

6. Certain serious fractures:

Identifies these patients who receive second priority for evacuation. Such atients need care, but the injuries are not life threatening. They fall into the following categories:

1. Second-degree burns covering more than 30 per cent of the body.

2. Third degree burns covering 10 per cent of the body.

3. Burns complicated by major lesions to soft tissue or minor fractures.

4. Third-degree burns involving such critical areas as hands, feet, or face but with no breathing problems present.

5. Moderate loss of blood (500-1, 000 cc)

6. Dorsal lesions, with or without injury to the spinal column.

7. Conscious patients with significant craiocerebral damage (serious enough to cause a subdural hematoma or mental confusion). Such patients will show one of the following signs:

 

Used on patients who are given third priority for evacuation and who fall into the following categories:

1. Minor fractures (fingers, teeth, etc)

2. Other minor lesions, abrasions, contusions.

3. Minor burns:

a) Second-degree burns covering less than 15 per cent of the body.

b) Third-degree burns covering less than 2 per cent of the body surface.

c) First-degree burns covering less than 20 per cent of the body, excluding hands, feet, and face.

  1. Second and third degree with burns over more than 40 per cent of the body, with death seeming reasonably certain.
  2. Second-and third degree burns over more than 40 per cent of the body, with other major lesions, as well as major fractures, major craiocerebral lesions, thoracic lesions, etc.
  3. Cranial lesions with brain tissue exposed and the patient unconscious.
  4. Craiocerebral lesions where the patient is unconscious and has major fractures.
  5. Lesions of the spinal column with absence of sensitivity and movement.
  6. Patient over 60 years old with major lesions.

[It should be noted that the line separating these patients from red-tag casualties is very tenuous. If there are any red-tag patients, this system will have to be followed. If there are none, the yellow-tag patients with apparently fatal injuries become red-tag candidates. The reason is simple; if there are many red-tag patients with a chance to survive and there are yellow-tag patients who apparently cannot be saved because of their injuries, the time spent on the dying wounded could be better spent on the patients with a chance to survive].

 

Black tags are placed on the dead, i.e., casualties without a pulse or respiration who have remained in that condition for over 20 minutes, or whose injuries render resuscitation procedures impossible.

Evacuation Procedures under the Following Conditions

 

1) Casualties not trapped or buried. Evacuate in the following order:

a) Red-tag casualties

b) Green-tag casualties

c) Yellow-tag casualties

 

2) Casualties trapped or buried. Evacuate in the following order:

a) Re-tag casualties

b) Green-tag casualties

c) Yellow-tag casualties

d) Black-tag casualties not trapped or buried

e) Trapped black-tag casualties.

 

 

6.4 Vector Control Standards – Flood

Vector control programmes should be planned so as to cope with two distinct situations:

  1. The initial phase immediately following the disaster, when control work should concentrate on the destruction, by a physical or chemical process, of vermin on persons, their clothing, bedding, and other belongings, and on domestic animals. An emergency sanitation team should be available from the beginning for carrying out this disinfestation.
  2. The period after the disaster subsided, control work should be directed towards proper food, sanitation, safe disposal of wastes, including drainage, and general and personal cleanliness.

 

 

Suggested Vector Surveillance Equipment and Supplies

 

Suggested Rodent Surveillance Equipment and Supplies

 

The guidelines for the working of the medical team engaged in providing medical relief to the affected people are indicated at checklist no3. Similarly guidelines for the prevention of the outbreak of epidemics in the affected area is indicated at Checklist 4.

 

 

6.5 Materials and Equipment

In the absence of clear indication from the field, the advance party should carry a minimum kit comprising of the following materials and equipments to the disaster site:

S. No.

Material/ equipment

Amount

1

Equipment for pediatric intravenous use

36

2

Tensiometers for children and adults

12

3

Assorted ferrules

2 boxes

4

Racheal cannulae

36

5

Set of laryngoscopes for infants, children each and adults

1

6

Endotracheal tubes, No. 7 Murphy

36

7

Plastic linings

60

8

Large scissors for cutting bandages

3

9

Oxygen masks, for adults and children

2 boxes

10

Nasogastric probes

36

11

Phonendoscopes

15

12

Endotracheal tubes No. 8

36

 

 

Sterlization Unit Supplies

S. No.

Material/ equipment

Amount

1

Hand Scissors,

46

2

Bottles for drainage of thorax

10

3

Set for small sutures

12

4

Venous dissection

set 6

5

Thorachotomy

set 6

6

Tracheotomy

set 6

7

Syringes (disposable) x 2 cc

60

8

Syringes (disposable) x 10 cc

90

9

Syringes (disposable) x 50 cc

60

 

 

Ambulance Fleet

The ambulances will carry the following equipment:

Sr. no.

Equipment

1

Minimal equipment for resucitation maneuvers

2

Drugs for emergency use

3

Venoclysis equipment

4

Supplies for immobilizing fractures

5

Suction equipment

6

Emergency first aid kit

7

Stretchers and blankets

8

Oxygen, oxygen mask, and manometer

 

A least a physician, a nurse, a stretcher- bearer, and a driver should staff each ambulance. The medical and paramedical personnel should be experienced in procedures for the management of patients in intensive care units. Equipment and Supplies required for Vermin control for population of 10,000 Power sprayers 2 Hand-pressured sprayers, capacity 20-30 liters 50 Dusters (hand-operated, plunger type) 50 Dusters, power-operated 2 Space sprayer 1

 

Adequate supply of accessories and spare parts for the above equipment Insecticides:

DDT, technical powder 0.5 tons

DDT, 75% water wettable 1-2 tons

DDT, 10% powder 1 ton

Dieldrin, 0.625-1.25% emulsifiable concentrate or 100 kg or wettable powder

Lindane, 0.5 % emulsifiable concentrate or wettable power 100 kg

Chlordane, 2% emulsifiable concentrate or wettable powder 100 kg

Malathion, 1% emulsifiable concentrate or wettable powder 100 kg

Dichlorvos emulsion 1-2 kg

Rodenticides, anticoagulant type (warfarin, etc.) 100

Rodent traps 100 rolls

Screen, for fly control 300-500

Garbage cans, capacity 50-100 liters

A* Quantity depends on availability and on distribution points.

 

 

6 Operation completion report:

The CMHO will send report to the District Magistrate through Disaster Emergency Control Room as soon as the task is over. The task completion report will indicate the number of injured people, the number of injured and dead.

On completion of all the tasks relating to Medical relief assigned to the health department by the District Magistrate, the CMHO will take a briefing session with his doctors and submit a briefing report to the District Magistrate.

Checklist 7

Preparedness Checklist for Public Health Department

(To be filled in by the Civil Surgeon and District Health Officer and submitted to the District Collector before may every year)

S. No.

Action

Remarks

yes/ no

1.

A hospital plan for the facilities, equipment and staff of that particular hospital based on "The Guide to Health Management in Disasters" has been developed.

 

2.

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

 

3.

All hospital staff has been informed about the possible disasters in the district, likely damages and effects, and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property

 

4.

Preparedness Measures taken Details/Remarks the department is familiar with disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

5

An area of the hospital has been identified for receiving large number of casualties

 

Designation Signature Date

 

Checklist 8

Checklist for Field Centres (to be filled in by the OFFICER-IN-CHARGE and submitted to district control room and the department head)

S. No.

Action

Remarks

yes/ no

1.

Surgical packs assembled and sterilised

 

2.

Field Staff are aware of tagging procedures

 

3.

Teams of doctors, nurses and dressers are visiting disaster sites set-up

 

4.

Transport for the transfer of seriously injured patients from villages and peripheral hospitals to general hospitals available

 

5

An area of the hospital has been identified for receiving large number of casualties

6

Health facility and treatment centres established at disaster sites

 

 

Water quality monitoring done at

 

Epidemic surveillance is being done at

 

Reported By:

 

Checklist 9

Casualty Treatment Post at camp sites and affected villages (To be Filled in by "OFFICER-IN-CHARGE- Health Services and submitted to district control room and the department head)

Action Y/N Details/Remarks

S. No.

Action

Remarks

yes/ no

Liaison with SOC for suitable location. Finalized suitable location.

1.

Communication link with SOC

 

2.

Sufficient privacy

 

3.

Separate area for relatives and visitors

 

4.

Near water supply

 

5

Adequate sanitation facilities for patients

6

Adequate sanitation facilities for relatives and visitors

7

Adequate sanitation facilities for staff

8

Suitably protected against weather conditions

9

Close to disaster site

10

Clear access/egress routes

Coordinating hospital, police Notified. First aid facilities available. Request for additional medical assistance sent to

1

Civil hospital

2

District control room

Stocks of traiage tags are available on hand. Records kept on

1

Names and address of casualties (As far as possible)

2

Type of injuries (As far as possible)

3

Transferred for further treatment

Records communicated to

1

Police

2

SOC

Information about intentions to close Casualty treatment Post communicated to

1

SOC

2

Police

 

Inspected By:

Designation Signature Date

 

Checklist 10a

Report and Checklist on Epidemics for each camp site and affected village (To be filled in by "OFFICER-IN-CHARGE-Health Services and submitted to district control room and the department head)

Time: _____________________

Name of the Village:

Name of the Camp:

An epidemic exists at the location:

An active threat of epidemics does not exist at the location:

Brief description of type of epidemic / affected area / location:

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

Brief description of assessment of risk of epidemics in affected area/ location and reasons

Thereof:

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Services / disciplines mobilised :

Discipline/

Organization

Notified (Y/N)

Time Mobilized (Y/N)

Standby (Y/N)

Alert (Y/N)

Contact person with address,

phone No.

Compiled By:

Designation Signature Date

 

Checklist 10b

I. Checklist for epidemic situations (To be filled in by "OFFICER-IN-CHARGE-Health Services and submitted to district control room and the department head)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

Warning and Instructions to public issued.

 

2

Cordoning off of affected areas recommended

 

3

Logistical support required

 

4

Cordoning off of roads required

 

5

Waste disposal system adequate

 

6

Sterlisation systems adequate

 

7

Life saving drugs adequate

 

8

Facilities for inoculation and vaccination exist

 

9

Supply of inoculation and vaccination exists

 

10

Accommodation for required number exists

 

11

Facilities for special diet exist

 

12

Risk of spread exists

 

13

Isolation of affected persons done

 

14

Facilities for testing water wastewater of contamination exist

 

15

Facilities for treatment of contaminated water/wastewater exist

 

16

Suitable protection of workers ensured

 

 

Inspected By:

Designation Signature Date

 

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

 

1.1 Introduction

Public Works Department has the responsibility for the construction and maintenance of Government buildings, public roads and bridges in the State. This infrastructure is required for not only the general economic activities in the area, but also for the performance of the task functions of the Government. These infrastructures will also be required for performing functions of search, rescue and evacuation operations in case of disaster and for organizing relief activities for the affected community including medical relief and relief centers.

 

 

1.2 Purpose of Sub-Plan:

This SOP is meant to ensure:

  1. ?Quick and effective performance of function
  2. ?Easy reference for coordination of response actions.

 

 

2.1 Preparedness Action:

For ensuring the availability of these infrastructures even in case of a disaster, the PWD should ensure that the construction of all buildings, roads and bridges take into account the hazardous scenario mentioned in Chapter 3. Alignment of all the major roads of the district should be as far as possible outside the flood clout area so that these roads remain operational even during the floods. All the public buildings and bridges should confirm to appropriate VIS course ensured that they survive the possible earthquake in the district.

The department should take immediate measures for the retrofitting of all Government buildings under its charge for making them seismic resistant. The department should ensure that all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department in District Emergency Management Plan and the resources that may be required for discharging his responsibility in case of a disaster. This should be achieved by organizing orientation training to all such officers in the month of May every year.

The department should identify the equipment and the material that may require for discharging the responsibilities assigned to it in case of disaster. It should also workout the availability of the same with the department and identify the external resources for the same and work out arrangement for procuring the same in case of disaster.

The department should do a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it, require for its responsibility under the plan in May every year. It should validate and update the resource database also in May every year. It will also identify the source in the community and the local market from which additional resource may be obtained for performing the responsibilities of the department with the assistance of the District Crisis Group and work out the arrangements for procuring the same.

The Executive Engineer should ensure compliance of all the points mentioned above and send a compliance report to the District Collector in general every year as per the checklist mentioned as checklist 11.

 

 

Operational details:

 

3.1 Tasks

The department will be responsible for performing the following tasks.

1. The Department will take up temporary construction of diversion and other structures to ensure road communication in case of disaster for conducting search, rescue and evacuation operation and providing relief to the affected people.

2. It will also establish temporary relief centers on the direction of the District Magistrate for the affected people.

3. Debris clearance to support searches and rescues operation.

4. Identification of unsafe buildings.

  1. Assessment of damage to the buildings.

 

 

3.2 Operations Control

The Executive Engineer will immediately try to get information regarding the road

Communication available for reaching the search and rescue team and the relief material to the affected area and will take immediate action for construction of the diversion and other structures for communication of the affected area. The Executive Engineer will also constitute survey teams for identification of unsafe buildings both private and Government which need to be demolished in the interest of the public safety and send a report of the identified unsafe buildings to the local Executive Magistrate through the local police station. The Executive Engineer will also nominate Sub Engineers for damage assessment of private buildings in consultation with District Collector.

 

 

4.1 Resources Available:

The department will prepare the resource database for the essential manpower, equipment and material resources available with the department in the database after identifying the needs of the disaster time.

 

 

4.2 Activation Guidelines:

In case of occurrence of disaster, all the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above will immediately report with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and seek instructions.

 

 

4.3 Task allocation

The Executive Engineer will allocate the tasks to his team.

 

 

5. Operation completion report:

After completion of all the task assigned to the department relating to immediate response, the Executive Engineer will take a debriefing session with all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers above and send a brief report to the District Collector which will also include an expenditure statement including the debris removal and establishment of the relief centers and construction of the diversion for ensuring communication in the affected areas.

The Executive Engineer will also prepare a preliminary proposal indicating the estimates of different construction works for restoring the infrastructure in the affected area and send it to the department through the District Collector.

 

Checklist 11

Checklist no .1 (to be filled by Executive engineer PWD in the month of may)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks

Y/N

1

Whether all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department by organizing orientation training in District this year?

 

2

Whether the department has identified the equipments, material and the external resources for the same that may be require for discharging the responsibilities during the disaster?

 

3

Whether the department did a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it and updated the same this year?

 

Filled by

Designation Date Signature

 

Checklist 12

Checklist no .1 (to be filled by Executive engineer PWD after activation of DDCR)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks

Y/N

1

Whether all the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above reported with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and took instructions?

 

2

Whether information regarding the road communication available, construction of the diversion and other structures for communication of the affected area taken?

 

3

Whether survey teams for identification of unsafe buildings both private and Government which need to be demolished in the interest of the public safety constituted and report sent to DDCR?

 

 

Designation Date Signature

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR PUBLIC HEALTH & ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT (PHED)

Introduction:

Public Health Engineering Department has the responsibility for the construction and maintenance of water supply in the State. This infrastructure is required for not only the general economic activities in the area, but also for the performance of the task functions of the Government. These infrastructures will also be required for performing functions of water availability to disaster affected area, relief centers.

 

 

1.2 Purpose of Sub-Plan:

The sub plan is meant to ensure:

  1. ?Quick and effective performance of function
  2. ?Easy reference for coordination of response actions.

 

 

2.1 Preparedness Action:

For ensuring the availability of these infrastructures even in case of a disaster, the PHED should ensure that the construction of all water supply infrastructure take into account the hazardous scenario. The entire water supply infrastructure should confirm to appropriate BIS codes ensuring that they survive the possible earthquake in the district.

The department should ensure that all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department in District Emergency Management Plan and the resources that may be required for discharging his responsibility in case of a disaster. This should be achieved by organizing orientation training to all such officers in the month of May every year. The department should identify the equipment and the material that may require for discharging the responsibilities assigned to it in case of disaster. It should also workout the availability of the same with the department and identify the external resources for the same and work out arrangement for procuring the same in case of disaster. The department should do a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it, require for its responsibility under the plan in May every year. It should validate and update the resource database also in May every year. It will also identify the source in the community and the local market from which additional resource may be obtained for performing the responsibilities of the department with the assistance of the District Crisis Group and work out the arrangements for procuring the same.

The Executive Engineer should ensure compliance of all the points mentioned above and send a compliance report to the District Collector in general every year as per the checklist mentioned as checklist 13.

 

 

Operational details:

3.1 Tasks

The department will be responsible for performing the following tasks.

  1. The Department will take up temporary restoration of water supply to affected area.
  2. It will also establish water supply at temporary relief centers on the direction of the District Magistrate for the affected people.

 

 

3.2 Operations Control

The Executive Engineer will immediately try to get information regarding the water supply to the affected area and will take immediate action for restoration of it. The Executive Engineer will also constitute survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure.

 

 

4.1 Resources Available:

The department will prepare the resource database for the essential manpower, equipment and material resources available with the department in the database.

 

 

4.2 Activation Guidelines:

In case of occurrence of disaster, all the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above will immediately report with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and seek instructions.

 

 

4.3 Task allocation

The Executive Engineer will allocate the tasks after consultation with DDCR chairman.

 

 

5. Operation completion report

The Executive Engineer After completion of the entire task assigned to the department relating to immediate response will take a briefing session with all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers. He will send a brief report to the District Collector which will also include an expenditure statement including the debris case and establishment of the centers and construction of the diversion for ensuring communication in the affected areas.

The Executive Engineer will also prepare a preliminary proposal indicating the estimates of different construction works for restoring the infrastructure in the affected area and send it to the department through the District Collector.

 

Checklist no. 13

Checklist no .1 (to be filled by Executive engineer PHED in the month of May)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department by organizing orientation training in District this year?

 

2

The department has identified the equipments, material and the external resources for the same that may be require for discharging the responsibilities during the disaster?

 

3

The department did a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it and updated the same this year?

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

Checklist no 14

Checklist no .2 (to be filled by Executive engineer PHED after activation of DDCR)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above reported with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and took instructions?

 

2

Information regarding the water supply of the affected area taken?

 

3

Survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure constituted and report sent to DDCR?

 

4

List of water supply tankers should be referred and arrangements done

 

5

Arrangement for distribution of bleaching powder, alum to village heads done

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

 

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR HARYANA VIDHUT PARSARAN NIGAM (HVPN)

 

1.1 Introduction:

Haryana Vidhut Parsaran Nigam has the responsibility for the construction and maintenance of electric supply in the State. This infrastructure is required for not only the general activities in the area, but also for the performance of the task functions of the Government. These infrastructures will also be required for performing functions of electric availability to disaster affected area, relief centers.

 

 

1.2 Purpose of Sub-Plan:

The sub-plan is meant to ensure:

  1. ?Quick and effective performance of function
  2. ?Easy reference for coordination of response actions.

 

2.1 Preparedness Action:

For ensuring the availability of these infrastructures even in case of a disaster, HVPN should ensure that the construction of all electric supply infrastructure take into account the hazardous scenario mentioned in Chapter ____. The entire electric supply infrastructure should confirm to appropriate BIS codes ensuring that they survive the possible earthquake in the district.

The department should ensure that all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department in District Emergency Management Plan and the resources that may be required for discharging his responsibility in case of a disaster. This should be achieved by organizing orientation training to all such officers in the month of May every year.

The department should identify the equipment and the material that may require for discharging the responsibilities assigned to it in case of disaster. It should also workout the availability of the same with the department and identify the external resources for the same and work out arrangement for procuring the same in case of disaster. The department should do a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it, require for its responsibility under the plan in May every year. It should validate and update the resource database also in May every year. It will also identify the source in the community and the local market from which additional resource may be obtained for performing the responsibilities of the department with the assistance of the District Crisis Group and work out the arrangements for procuring the same. The Executive Engineer should ensure compliance of all the points mentioned above and send a compliance report to the District Collector in general every year as per the checklist mentioned as Checklist no 15.

 

Operational details:

 

3.1 Tasks

The department will be responsible for performing the following tasks.

  1. The Department will take up temporary restoration of electric supply to affected area.
  2. It will also establish electric supply at relief centers on the direction of the District Magistrate for the affected people.

 

3.2 Operations Control

The Executive Engineer will immediately try to get information regarding the electric supply to the affected area and will take immediate action for restoration of it. The Executive Engineer will also constitute survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure.

 

 

4.1 Resources Available:

The department will prepare the resource database for the essential manpower, equipment and material resources available with the department in the database.

 

 

4.2 Activation Guidelines:

In case of occurrence of disaster, all the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above will immediately report with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and seek instructions.

 

 

4.3 Task allocation

The Executive Engineer will allocate the tasks after consultation with DDCR chairman.

 

5. Operation completion report:

After completion of all the task assigned to the department relating to immediate response, the Executive Engineer will take a briefing session with all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers above and send a brief report to the District Collector which will also include an expenditure statement including the debris case and establishment of the centers and construction of the diversion for ensuring communication in the affected areas.

The Executive Engineer will also prepare a preliminary proposal indicating the estimates of different construction works for restoring the infrastructure in the affected area and send it to the department through the District Collector.

 

 

Checklist no 15

Checklist no .1 (to be filled by Executive engineer HVPN in the month of May)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department by organizing orientation training in District this year?

 

2

The department has identified the equipment, material and the external resources for the same that may be require for discharging the responsibilities during the disaster?

 

3

The department did a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it and updated the same this year?

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

 

Checklist no 16

Checklist no .2 (to be filled by Executive engineer HVPN after activation of DDCR)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above reported with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and took instructions?

 

2

Information regarding the electric supply of the affected area taken?

 

3

Survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure constituted and report sent to DDCR?

 

4

List of electric supply generators should be referred and arrangements done.

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR IRRIGATION

1.1 Introduction:

Department has the responsibility for the construction and maintenance of water supply for irrigation purpose in the State. This infrastructure is required for not only the general economic activities in the area, but also for the performance of the task functions of the Government. These infrastructures will also be required for performing functions of water availability to disaster affected area, relief centers.

 

 

1.2 Purpose of Sub-Plan:

The sub-plan is meant to ensure:

  1. Quick and effective performance of function
  2. Easy reference for coordination of response actions.

 

2.1 Preparedness Action:

For ensuring the availability of these infrastructures even in case of a disaster, the Irrigation should ensure that the construction of all water supply infrastructure take into account the hazardous scenario. The entire water supply for irrigation purpose infrastructure should confirm to appropriate BIS codes ensuring that they survive the possible earthquake in the district.

The department should ensure that all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department in District Emergency Management Plan and the resources that may be required for discharging his responsibility in case of a disaster. This should be achieved by organizing orientation training to all such officers in the month of May every year.

The department should identify the equipment and the material that may require for discharging the responsibilities assigned to it in case of disaster. It should also workout the availability of the same with the department and identify the external resources for the same and work out arrangement for procuring the same in case of disaster. The department should do a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it, require for its responsibility under the plan in May every year. It should validate and update the resource database also in May every year. It will also identify the source in the community and the local market from which additional resource may be obtained for performing the responsibilities of the department with the assistance of the District Crisis Group and work out the arrangements for procuring the same.

The Executive Engineer should ensure compliance of all the points mentioned above and send a compliance report to the District Collector in general every year as per the checklist mentioned as Checklist no 17

 

 

Operational details:

3.1 Tasks

The department will be responsible for performing the following tasks.

  1. The Department will take up temporary restoration of water supply to affected area.
  2. It will also establish water supply at temporary relief centers on the direction of the District Magistrate for the affected people.

 

 

3.2 Operations Control

The Executive Engineer will immediately try to get information regarding the water supply to the affected area and will take immediate action for restoration of same. The Executive Engineer will also constitute survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure.

 

 

4.1 Resources Available:

The department will prepare the resource database for the essential manpower, equipment and material resources available with the department in the database.

 

 

4.2 Activation Guidelines:

In case of occurrence of disaster, all the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above will immediately report with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and seek instructions.

 

 

4.3 Task allocation

The Executive Engineer will allocate the tasks after consultation with DDCR chairman.

 

5. Operation complete

After completion of all the task assigned to the department relating to immediate response, the Executive Engineer will take a briefing session with all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers above and send a brief report to the District Collector which will also include an expenditure statement including the debris case and establishment of the centers and construction of the diversion for ensuring communication in the affected areas.

The Executive Engineer will also prepare a preliminary proposal indicating the estimates of different construction works for restoring the infrastructure in the affected area and send it to the department through the District Collector.

 

Checklist no 17

Checklist no .1 (to be filled by Executive engineer IRRIGATION in the month of May)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department by organizing orientation training in District this year.

 

2

The department has identified the equipment, material and the external resources for the same that may be require for discharging the responsibilities during the disaster

 

3

The department did a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it and updated the same this year

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

Checklist no 18

Checklist no .2 (to be filled by Executive engineer Irrigation after activation of

DDCR)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All the officers of the department of the rank of sub Engineers and above reported with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and took instructions

 

2

Information regarding the irrigation canals and infrastructure of the affected area taken

 

3

Survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure constituted and report sent to DDCR

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT

1. Introduction

An earthquake generally causes no damage of the existing crops in the field but the floods generally causes damage to the existing crops. For mitigating the adverse impact of floods on the community it is essential that the Agriculture Department prepares a contingency plan for raising suitable crops after the withdrawl of flood waters as it is important for the overall wellbeing of the community. This contingency plan will not be part of the immediate response operations but will also be the part of the recovery operations yet it is imperative to set into motion this contingency plan to make use of the residual moisture and the remaining period of the monsoon.

 

2. Purpose of Sub-Plan:

The sop will provide guidance to the agriculture department to keep themselves prepared for disaster. It provides checklist for the department to be filled by department head in the month of may every year and one to be filled after flood.

 

3. Preparedness action:

The Agriculture Department should identify crops and short duration seeds, which can be raised after the withdrawal of floodwaters. It should identify agriculture equipment, which may be required after disaster for pest control. Besides this likely damages, pests or disease expected, and what drugs and other insecticide will be required should be determined.

The department should also identify the resources of such needs and work out an arrangement for the transport and quick distribution of the needs in collaboration with the cooperative networks and the commercial banks.

The department should coordinate with banks for granting loans to the affected farmers for irrigation system failure repair loan. A campaign for educating people for it should be held at various places.

The extension staff of the department should be made aware of the possibilities of such short duration crops and seeds and the management practices for the same. A checklist Checklist no 19 is given which will be filled in the month of May by the head and submit to DDCR.

 

Operational task:

??On receipt of warning of flood,

  1. The department should immediately contact the identified suppliers of short duration seeds and find out the availability of the same.

 

??On the occurrence on flood

  1. It should assess the extent of damage to soil, crop, plantation, and storage facilities and the requirement to salvage. The department should contact the farmers and workout the requirement of short duration seeds, fertilizers, pesticides as per the contingency planning.
  2. It should try to facilitate mobilization of inputs like short duration seeds, credit fertilizers and pesticides on an emergency basis.

 

Operation completion report:

  1. After the disaster period, the head will submit a report to DDCR head, which will be in the form of checklist to be filled during the period of disaster. The checklist is given as

 

Checklist 19

(Checklist to be filled in the month of May by the head.)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

Whether the Agriculture Department has identified crops and short duration seeds, which can be raised after the withdrawal of floodwaters?

 

2

Whether the Agriculture Department has identified agriculture equipment, which may be required after disaster?

 

3

Whether the Agriculture Department has identified pests or disease expected, and what drugs and other insecticide required for them? Whether the Agriculture

 

4

Department has identified the resources of above needs and work out an arrangement for the transport and quick distribution of the needs in collaboration with the cooperative networks and the commercial banks

 

5

Whether the extension staff of the department is made aware of the possibilities of such short duration crops and seeds and the management practices for the same?

 

 

Designation Signature Date

Checklist no 20

(Checklist to be filled during disaster operation by the head.)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

Whether the department has contacted the identified suppliers of short duration seeds and enquired the availability of the same?

 

2

Whether the department has assessed the extent of damage to soil, crop, plantation, and storage facilities and the requirement to salvage?

 

3

Whether the department has contacted the farmers and workout the requirement of short duration seeds, fertilizers, pesticides as per the contingency planning?

 

 

 

Designation Signature Date

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR DEPARTMENT of TELECOMMUNICATION (DOT)
  2. 1. Introduction:

    Communication systems are vital component of any disaster warning planning and also for organizing immediate response operations in a disaster affected area. The State Government agencies generally use the Police Wireless system during such disasters.

    The communication system of the DoT is very much essential for an effective communication with the affected people and their relatives and also for ensuring communication with different agencies. Therefore, it is imperative that the communication system of DoT remains operational during the warning stage and the immediate response stage of a disaster.

    2. Purpose of SOP:

    The sop will provide guidance to DoT to keep them prepared for disaster. It provides checklist for the department to be filled by Divisional Engineer in the month of may every year and one to be filled after onset of disaster.

    3. Preparedness action:

    The DoT should inspect and repair all radio masts, anchorage, foundation and cables, poles and overhead circuits especially before onset of mansoon. They should upgrade outside equipment to withstand windspeeds and other adverse weather condition. All storage batteries should be charged fully for use during disaster period, when supply of electricity is likely to unavailable. To assess preparedness action A checklist Checklist no 21 is given which will be filled in the month of May by the head and submit to DDCR.

    4. Operational task:

    On the occurrence of any disaster, the Divisional Engineer of DoT must contact the District Collector and try to find out the priorities for restoration of communication facilities to facilitate prompt emergency response operation. Floods generally occur after heavy rainfalls, which cause dislocation of communication links. Therefore, mobilization of resources for emergency response in case of floods may face the problem of dislocated communication links. Therefore, even in case of heavy floods the Divisional Engineer of DoT must contact the District Collector to find out the priorities for restoration of communication facilities to facilitate emergency operations. He should establish temporary communication facilities through mobile exchanges for mobilising resources on priority use by DDCR, Medical Relief Centers and Site Operation Centers. An assessment of damage listing damage to Overhead cables, specific equipment damage should be carried out.

    Operation completion report:

    After the disaster period, the head will submit a report to DDCR head, which will be in the form of checklist to be filled during the period of disaster. The checklist is given as Checklist no 22.

    Checklist no 21

    (Checklist to be filled in the month of May by the head.)

    S. No.

    Actions

    Remarks Y/N

    1

    The DoT has inspected and repair all radio masts, anchorage, foundation and cables, poles and overhead circuits especially before onset of mansoon

     

    2

    The DoT have upgraded outside equipment to withstand windspeeds and other adverse weather condition

     

    3

    All storage batteries are charged fully for use, when supply of electricity is likely to unavailable

     

    Designation Signature Date

    Checklist no 22

    (Checklist to be filled during disaster operation by the head.)

    S. No.

    Actions

    Remarks Y/N

    1

    The District Collector contacted and the priorities for restoration of communication facilities to facilitate prompt emergency response operation found out

     

    2

    Communication facilities through mobile exchanges for mobilising resources on priority use by DDCR, Medical Relief Centers and Site Operation Centers is established

     

    3

    An assessment of damage listing damage to Overhead cables, specific equipment damage carried out

     

    Designation Signature Date

  3. SUB-PLAN FOR MUNICIPAL COMMIITTEE (MC)

Introduction:

Municipal Committee has the responsibility for the construction and maintenance of water supply in the city of Rohtak. This infrastructure is required for not only the general economic activities in the area, but also for the performance of the task functions of the Government. These infrastructures will also be required for performing functions of water availability to disaster affected area, relief centers.

 

1.2 Purpose of SOP:

This SOP is meant to ensure:

  1. Quick and effective performance of function
  2. Easy reference for coordination of response actions.

 

2.1 Preparedness Action:

For ensuring the availability of these infrastructures even in case of a disaster, The Municipal Committee should ensure that the construction of all water supply infrastructure take into account the hazardous scenario. The entire water supply infrastructure should confirm to appropriate BIS codes ensuring that they survive the possible earthquake in the district.

The department should ensure that all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department in District Emergency Management Plan and the resources that may be required for discharging his responsibility in case of a disaster. This should be achieved by organizing orientation training to all such officers in the month of May every year.

The department should identify the equipment and the material that may require for discharging the responsibilities assigned to it in case of disaster. It should also workout the availability of the same with the department and identify the external resources for the same and work out arrangement for procuring the same in case of disaster.

The department should do a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it, require for its responsibility under the plan in May every year. It should validate and update the resource database also in May every year. It will also identify the source in the community and the local market from which additional resource may be obtained for performing the responsibilities of the department with the assistance of the District Crisis Group and work out the arrangements for procuring the same. The Executive Engineer should ensure compliance of all the points mentioned above and send a compliance report to the District Collector in general every year as per the checklist mentioned as Checklist no 23

 

 

Operational details:

3.1 Tasks

The department will be responsible for performing the following tasks.

  1. The Department will take up temporary restoration of water supply to affected area.
  2. It will also establish water supply at temporary relief centers on the direction of the District Magistrate for the affected people.
  3. The department will provide necessary earthmoving equipment to aid debris clearance.

 

 

3.2 Operations Control

The Executive Engineer will immediately try to get information regarding the water supply to the affected area and will take immediate action for restoration of it. The Executive Engineer will also constitute survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure.

 

 

4.1 Resources Available:

The department will prepare the resource database for the essential manpower, equipment and material resources available with the department in the database.

 

 

4.2 Activation Guidelines:

In case of occurrence of disaster, all the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above will immediately report with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and seek instructions.

 

 

4.3 Task allocation

The Executive Engineer will allocate the tasks after consultation with DDCR chairman.

 

 

6. Operation completion report

After completion of all the task assigned to the department relating to immediate

response, the Executive Engineer will take a briefing session with all officers of the rank of Sub Engineers above and send a brief report to the District Collector which will also include an expenditure statement including the debris case and establishment of the centers and construction of the diversion for ensuring communication in the affected areas.

The Executive Engineer will also prepare a preliminary proposal indicating the estimates of different construction works for restoring the infrastructure in the affected area and send it to the department through the District Collector.

 

Checklist no 23

(to be filled by Executive engineer Municipal Committee in the month of May)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All officers of the rank of Sub Engineers or above are made familiar about the responsibilities of the department by organizing orientation training in District this year?

 

2

The department has identified the equipments, material and the external resources for the same that may be require for discharging the responsibilities during the disaster?

 

3

The department did a stock verification of the equipment and material available with it and updated the same this year?

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

 

Checklist no 24

(to be filled by Executive engineer Municipal Committee after activation of DDCR)

S. No.

Actions

Remarks Y/N

1

All the officers of the department of the rank of Sub Engineers and above reported with the DDCR through the Executive Engineer and took instructions?

 

2

Information regarding the water supply of the affected area taken?

 

3

Survey teams for identification of damaged infrastructure constituted and report sent to DDCR?

 

4

List of water supply tankers should be referred and arrangements done

 

5

Arrangement for distribution of bleaching powder, alum to village heads done

 

6

The department will provide necessary earthmoving equipment to aid debris clearance

 

 

Date Designation Signature

 

 

  1. SUB-PLAN FOR DISTRICT EMERGENCY CONTROL ROOM (DDCR)

1. Introduction:

District Emergency Control Room (DDCR) mentioned in this Plan would be the nodal control & coordination point for management of operations during emergency situations. The hazard scenario of Rohtak district mentioned in Chapter 4, of this Plan highlights that there is moderate risk of earthquake and flood. In view of this hazard scenario, there seems to be no need to deploy large manpower in DDCR in normal times. The emergency situations in normal times are considered as minor emergencies, which can be handled on a regular day-to-day basis by the local police, fire department and the health department.

There is practically no need to activate the DDCR beyond the routine staff for such minor emergencies. It is proposed that at normal times, the DDCR should have only one or two support staff. In the event of warning of heavy rains in the district, the District Collector would increase and activate the DDCR beyond the routine staff to cope with what is described as limited emergencies. Therefore, it is being proposed that the DDCR should operate during rainy season from 1 st July till 31 st of October to meet the challenges of limited emergency. During this period the District Collector should direct activation of DDCR through support staff deployed on duty by rotation, so, that the Control Room is functional round the clock.

At least six staff should be deployed on duty on rotation basis. On receipt of warning or information of a disaster most of the communication links of DDCR should be made fully operational.

 

 

2. Purpose of SOP:

DDCR is an institutional arrangement for coordinated functioning of different response agencies. The purpose of this SOP is:

  1. To provide procedure for quick & effective coordination.
  2. To ensure DDCR acts as a nodal coordination center for all response operations.

 

 

3. Preparedness Action:

In view of increase in seismic activities and moderate risk of flash flood during the rainy season, DDCR should start functioning from 1 st July to 31 st October. Assessment of preparedness action should also be done, during the first week of July. A meeting of the District Crisis Group members should be held to assess the preparedness action taken on part of different response agencies. The District Collector would ensure that the concerned response agencies validate and update their resource inventory in June every year. The concerned response agencies will be required to submit their preparedness status report in the format mentioned in their SOPs, placed at Annexure. On completion of assessment, the District Collector would send a preparedness report to the State Relief Commissioner in the month of July every year.

The District Collector will appoint a senior administrative officer as an officer-in-charge of DDCR. The District Collector will also appoint Desk Officers for DDCR in consultation with the District Crisis Group members in July every year, so that in case of an emergency, these Desk Officers can immediately assume their charge and the DDCR becomes fully operational.

The Officer-in-charge requisitioned for DDCR should assess the adequacy of preparedness measures taken in the Control Room to cope with an emergency situation.

The format mentioned in Checklist No. 1 placed at Checklist no 25 should be filled by the OIC and he will send compliance to the District Collector. Additional staff will be appointed to support the Desk Officers for managing desk operations in the DDCR.

 

 

4. Operational Tasks:

(a) District Crisis Group (DCG)

DCG would be the Operations Control Group and the decision making body, which would issue directions to the Desk Officers of DDCR. District Collector will head the group. It will control & coordinate the response operations through respective Desk Officers.

Tasks of DCG:

The composition and responsibilities of DCG is mentioned in Chapter 7 of this District Emergency Management Plan, however, its task is being reproduced here for easy reference.

 

b) Officer-in-charge (OIC) of DDCR

The District Collector will appoint a senior administrative officer as an OIC of the DDCR.

Task of OIC:

 

 

Communication & Information management functions would include:

 

 

c) Desk Officers

It will be practically difficult for the DCG to be present round the clock in the DDCR. The District Collector in consultation with the DCG members will appoint the Desk Officers. Each desk will have two Desk Officers assigned for duty on rotation basis. Thus, the DDCR will have senior representatives in the capacity of Desk Officers to man the following desks:

(i) Search, Rescue & Evacuation desk

(ii) Logistics & Welfare desk

(iii) Medical desk

(iv) Infrastructure desk

 

 

Tasks of respective desks:

(i) Search, Rescue & Evacuation desk -Deputy

Superintendent of Police will head the Search, Rescue & Evacuation desk. Tasks:

??Monitor evacuation operation.

??Monitor search and rescue operations at the disaster site.

??Monitor restoration of law and order situation at the site.

??Ensure security to properties of the affected people.

 

(ii) Logistics & Welfare desk –

An administrative Officer from the revenue department will man the Logistics & Welfare desk He would be the incharge of logistics arrangements.

 

 

Tasks:

??Issue directions and monitor setting of relief camps, cattle camps.

??Arrangements for distribution of dry rations in flood affected areas.

??Arrangements for relief supplies to transit and relief camps or to Site Operations Centre

??Ensure supply of fodder to cattle camps

??Monitor Public Welfare Services

??Assign area of operations

??Report procurement and disbursement of relief materials received through government and non-government channels

??Keep record of receipt and utilization of relief materials obtained from external sources.

??Assess and reinforce needs in terms of manpower and deployment of resources as per information

??Identify requirement, availability and location of depots, and transportation of wood to the locations for mass cremation

??Identify location where carcasses can be disposed and manpower and transport that would be required for this work

??Report requirement of additional resources.

??Ensure safe storage, and transportation of relief supplies

??Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGO’s and other organizations including private donors

??Coordinate with private transporters to meet transportation needs if required.

??Arrange transport for Rescue parties, Relief Personnel, Essential supplies viz. water, medicines, first aid and cooked food for marooned persons. In case of increase in workload the District Collector would requisition an officer from the revenue department who would be responsible for monitoring the financial requirement during response operation.

Task of this officer will include maintenance of:

??Account of all cash receipts according to source of funding.

??Accounts of all cash disbursements according to source of funding Stock register for all relief materials.

??Issue register for all relief materials.

??Maintain dead stock register of all non-consumables (inventory).

??Record of all personnel payment on TA&DA daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

??Records of all expenses incurred on administration and disaster management.

??Records of all transfer of funds (as advances) to other government departments.

??Record of all cash vouchers and credit vouchers.

??Records of all gratuitous relief.

??Records of all compensation paid.

??Prepare records relating to finance and accounts.

??Record of all cash and materials receipt.

??Record of all payments of approved expenses, dues, claims, and daily wages.

??Record of reimbursement of expenses approved by administration.

??Record of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel.

 

(iii) Medical desk -A

Senior medical officer will man medical desk. He will liaison with the desk officers

Responsible to monitor the function of Public Health & Family Welfare Department

(PH&FWD) as the case may be in order to ensure appropriate health related relief operation.

 

Task:

??Monitor and maintain record of treatment of injured and sick.

??Monitor preventive measures and anti-epidemic actions taken.

??Prepare report on food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste.

??Assess the need, supply and supervise medical relief for the injured.

??Keep an account of the number of ambulances required

??Maintain and update the inventory of hospitals both public and private.

??Monitor medical equipment and medicines required.

??Collect information regarding outbreak of epidemics or need to augment medical relief resources in highly affected areas.

??Liaison with PH&FWD for supply of safe drinking water through tankers and other means of transport.

??Ensure the (PH&FWD) take water purification measures.

 

(iv) Infrastructure desk –

A senior officer from any one of the works department viz. PWD, PHED, HVPN, NVDD, Water Resource Department, and Municipal Corporation will head the Infrastructure desk. The Desk officer would be the nodal officer incharge to Coordinate and monitor the restoration activities done by the respective works department.

 

Task:

??Organize and coordinate clearance of debris.

??Monitor temporary repairs of damaged infrastructure viz. Power, Water supply,

Telecommunication, Roads, Bridges, Canals, Public buildings, repair of hand-pumps and borewells.

 

5. Details of resources available for coordinated response operations:

The DDCR being a nodal coordination point should keep record of resource inventory of all response agencies, for its quick deployment as and when required. An updated inventory of resources in terms of manpower, machine and material of different departments should be available in DDCR in the prescribed format placed at Annexure-III

6. Procurement of supplementary resources:

Respective desk officers would inform the District Collector regarding the need to procure additional resources, in case the available resources are insufficient to meet the requirement. In addition to this the respective desk officers should have information of source agencies from where the resources can be procured. The resource inventory placed at Annexure III also mentions the source agencies for supplementing the resources.

The District Collector would direct accordingly the source agencies to supply resources where required.

 

7. Activation Guidelines:

On the occurrence of an earthquake, the District Collector will immediately convene a meeting of the DCG members at the DDCR to make preliminary assessment of the situation. He would issue instructions to all response agencies through respective Desk Officers requisitioned in DDCR for immediate mobilization.

On warning for flood the OIC would inform the concerned Desk Officers (all agencies responsible for evacuation, search and rescue operations) of the DDCR.

The activation of different response agencies would be as mentioned below:

 

(i) Police

Police control room will receive direction and information from the DDCR. The

Activation guidelines to be followed by the police department is mentioned in detail in SOP for Police placed at Annexure Ib. Activation directions for Homeguards department are placed at Annexure Ic.

 

(ii) Health

The Health department will receive direction and information from the DDCR. The activation guidelines to be followed by the health department is mentioned in detail in SOP for Health placed at Annexure Id .

(iii) Revenue

The Revenue department will receive direction and information from the DDCR. The activation guidelines to be followed by the revenue department are mentioned in detail in SOP for Revenue department placed at Annexure Ia.

(iv) Infrastructure departments

The infrastructure departments will receive information from the concerned desk officer requisitioned in DDCR. The activation guidelines to be followed by the infrastructure department is mentioned in detail in SOP for PWD, PH&FWD, Water Resource Department, NVDD, HVPN, PHED and Municipal Corporation placed at Annexure Ie,f,g,h,i,k,l. .

 

8. Senior Departmental Supervisors:

The District Collector would be the authoritative body to issue instruction at the time of disaster or even before it, as the case may be. Senior departmental supervisors involved in control & coordination of response operations through DDCR would comprise of:

 

 

(i) Revenue desk –

District Collector will be the senior most supervising authority of all rescue & relief operations. A Deputy will support him or Additional Collector appointed as Desk Officer in DDCR.

 

(ii) Police desk-Superintendent of Police (SP) will be the senior most officers to control and direct response operations of the Police. His directions will be executed in field through the Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) appointed as Desk Officer in DDCR.

 

(iii) Health desk-Chief Medical Health Officer (CMHO) will be the senior most officer to control and direct medical relief operations of the Health department. His directions will be executed in field through the Senior Health Officer appointed as Desk Officer in DDCR.

 

(iv) Infrastructure desk-Executive Engineer PWD, Divisional Engineer HVPN, Chief Engineer Water Resource Department, Chief Engineer NVDD, Municipal Commissioner of Municipal Corporation will be the senior most officers to control and direct response and restoration operations of their respective departments. A senior level officer requisitioned as Desk Officer will be the representative of all works department in the DDCR.

 

9. Direction & Coordination:

??The District Collector and the concerned Sub-divisional officer will reach the affected area to coordinate response & relief operations.

??The District Collector and other members of the DCG who would be at the disaster site would be in constant contact with the DDCR through wireless system.

??Coordination of all response operations will be through the DDCR.

??The Desk Officers of all response agencies in the DDCR will be responsible for interagency coordination.

 

10. Issue of warning:

Operational Guidelines for issue of warning:

??The forecasting agency viz. IMD which forecasts rainfall duration and CWC which monitors change in water level in river channels due to rainfall will communicate warning for flood to State Relief Commissioner.

 

 

Disaster Forecasting Agencies

Earthquakes IMD, NGRI Floods IMD, CWC

??The office of the State Relief Commissioner will issue warning to Divisional

Commissioner and District Collector.

??Only the designated agencies / officer will issue the warning. District Collector will be the authoritative body to issue warning to officials of central government agencies, Mayor, Chairman Zila Panchayat, MP and MLA of the district, nearest defense unit and the staff of DDCR.

??The staff appointed for DDCR during normal time will immediately inform the Officer incharge (OIC) of the DDCR of any alert message and act promptly on the instruction of OIC.

??The OIC will inform the Desk Officers

??In case of flood warning the District Collector will issue direction for evacuation to the OIC in DDCR. The OIC will inform the respective desk officers to activate their evacuation plan.

??In case of earthquake the information regarding the disaster will be conveyed to the OIC of DDCR and the Desk officers will be informed to activate response operations as per their Standard Operating Procedure.

??Important considerations for dissemination of warning:

- Communities in flood & earthquake prone areas are aware of the hazard and severity

- Warning systems.

-All warning systems are checked and maintained in working condition

- Alternate-warning systems identified

??The warning should be clear and target specific.

??Warning issued to response agencies to activate trigger mechanism. The statement should mention:

- Severity

- Possible impact to population in low lying areas

- Area to be inundated or area most affected due to earthquake

- Need to activate evacuate plan

??Warning statement issued to the community should be conveyed in a simple language. The statement should mention:

- The severity of flood / earthquake

- Possible impact to population in low lying areas

- Area to be inundated or area most affected due to earthquake

- Need to evacuate

- Duration of flooding and changes in flood level in river channel

- Do's and Don'ts to ensure appropriate response.

??Rumor control.

??All response agencies are alert

??Assistance of community leaders and Community based organizations should be involved in explaining the threat to the community.

??Once a warning is issued, it should be followed-up by subsequent warnings in order to keep the people informed of the latest situations.

??An authoritative body will issue no threat statement once the situations return to normal.

 

11. Evacuation procedure:

Earthquake cannot be predicted, hence warning for evacuation is not possible. In case of flood warning, the need to evacuate the population from low-lying areas should be decided keeping in view the lead-time before an area gets inundated. The District Collector in consultation with the DCG members would decide for evacuation on receipt of flood warning from the concerned forecasting agencies. The Collector would be the authoritative body to issue direction for evacuation. The OIC of DDCR would convey the directions to Desk Officers of concerned agencies, which are responsible to execute evacuation.

 

Basic consideration for evacuation:

??The DCG will define area to be evacuated

??DCG will decide the probable duration of evacuation on the basis of meteorological observations and intimation by the concerned forecasting agencies.

??The evacuating agency should identify number of people for evacuation, destination of evacuees, lead time available, welfare requirements of evacuees.

??Identify resources to meet the needs for evacuation viz. manpower, transport, supplies, equipment, communications and security of the evacuated area.

??The evacuating agency should check availability, capability and durability of the required resources.

??The evacuating agency should set priorities for evacuation in terms of areas likely to be flooded.

??The evacuating agency should decide hoe to execute evacuation viz.

- Delivery of warning

- Transport arrangement

- Control and timing of movement

- Fulfill welfare needs

- Registration of evacuees

??All agencies involved in evacuation operation will coordinate in field.

??Be in touch with the OIC to pass warnings, advice and information to the public. The OIC will convey the message through the District Information Officer / Public Relations Officer.

??Organize movement of evacuees

- Identify evacuation routes

- Traffic control

-Identify officer to control evacuation in field

- Allocation of responsibilities

- Communication facility

??Post-evacuation operations will include organize return of evacuees.

 

12. Report Tasks in progress & completed in DDCR

Once the DDCR is fully operational with different desk officers, the OIC will fill up the Checklist No. 2 placed at Checklist no 26 to ensure the status of tasks.

 

 

13. Debriefing

Debriefing will be carried out on the instruction of the District Collector on completion of operations of DDCR. The OIC will submit operation completion report to the DCG.

 

 

Checklist No. 1: Preparedness assessment of DDCR

S.No. ACTION TAKEN YES / NO REMARKS

1. Whether the response agencies have

submitted their preparedness report?

(i) Revenue

(ii) Police

(iii) Homeguards

(iv) Health

(v) PWD

(vi) HVPN

(vii) NVDA

(viii) Irrigation

(ix) PHED

(x) DoT

(xi) Agriculture

2. Whether DDCR has followinginformation?

(a) District Map showing vulnerable areas, identified shelters and road communication.

(b) A copy of the District Emergency Management Plan.

(c) Updated resource inventory of all response agencies.

(d) Communication facilities viz. telephone, Fax, wireless set and basic facilities like mechanical typewriter, Xerox machine and generating set are in working condition.

3. Whether the support staff of DDCR has been briefed about their responsibilities?

 

 

Checklist No. 2: Task report of DDCR

S. No. Actions Taken Y/N Remark

  1. Note down incident, verify :

i. Name-ii.

Severity-iii.

Off side effects-2.

Alert Desk Officers:

(i) Search, Rescue & Evacuation desk

(ii) Logistics & Welfare desk

(iii) Medical desk

(iv) Infrastructure desk

3. Maintenance of DDCR facilities:

??food, water and basic amenities

??emergency lights, communication system

4. Report on status of response operations:

(i) Search, Rescue & Evacuation desk

(ii) Logistics & Welfare desk

(iii) Medical desk

(iv) Infrastructure desk

Designation Signature Date

Other information required:

  1. List of Active NGO’s with their resources.
  2. List of Voluntary Organisations and their resources.
  3. List of Community Based Organisations and their resources.
  4. List of Donor Agencies (National and International).

 

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